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My teacher brought it up in psych class. I'm genuinely concerned I tried looking it because I'm highly concerned. Are there other factors. Someone explain and help

My teacher brought it up in psych class. I'm genuinely concerned I tried looking it because I'm highly concerned. Are there other factors. Someone explain and help

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[–] Hollyhock 9 points Edited

I personally don't, but there's also a gray area w/ what is rape fantasy vs. what is "I don't want to admit I want to have sex" fantasy. Even the trashiest romance novels which have so-called rape fantasies follow tropes where the event is resolved to the woman's satisfaction, so if there's any fantasy, it's about a virginal, unsure woman who is forced to marry a rogue duke, who is handsome and is later found to be nice to babies and puppies. She has 'surprise' orgasms and wants to have sex w/ him again despite being violated, and it feeds on her guilty about it. While technically this is rape because the story shows how she originally didn't consent, her unease turns to desire and then love, so her consent is resolved.

These fantasies in the romance trope allow women who may have repressive situations (like unhappy marriages, strict families, restrictive cultures, guilt, shame) to enjoy guilt-free sex because the choice is ostensibly removed from them. There used to be a time, and still is for many women, when good girls only ever say no. A romance 'rape' allows women to say yes when they are supposed to say no.

I don't see those as actual rape fantasies.