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Hey all,

I was thinking about this earlier when I remembered the tragic Leela Alcorn story. What do you think are the best ways to help children/teens with dysphoria or what do you think the best path would have been for you?

Obviously the system at the moment is very much broken, but I think with all the cries to abolish surgeries and hormones we need to be sure what is going to be put in place in its stead. A lot of trans identified teens aren’t going to want to go to therapy or try to embrace their birth sex, and therapy is not very effective if the patient doesn’t cooperate, but perhaps it could be coupled with other approaches?

What do you all think?

Hey all, I was thinking about this earlier when I remembered the tragic Leela Alcorn story. What do you think are the best ways to help children/teens with dysphoria or what do you think the best path would have been for you? Obviously the system at the moment is very much broken, but I think with all the cries to abolish surgeries and hormones we need to be sure what is going to be put in place in its stead. A lot of trans identified teens aren’t going to want to go to therapy or try to embrace their birth sex, and therapy is not very effective if the patient doesn’t cooperate, but perhaps it could be coupled with other approaches? What do you all think?

7 comments

I apologize, I forget her last name, but her first name is Sidney? She’s a detrans woman and her story I think is really interesting. Her mom got her away from the devices and the internet and got her into a program working with horses. She says this helped her get out of her own head. I think this is really important. So much of the dysphoria/trans identity stuff is this constant navel gazing and almost self obsession. I hate saying it like that, but kids are kind of obsessed with themselves. They can’t help it, their brains are underdeveloped. Anyway, I think therapy is important too, of course, but so is finding them real hobbies and interests outside of “being trans.” Finding more productive ways to dedicate your time and energy is honestly pretty positive for most people.

I don’t have kids, but that’s what I would probably want to do. Encourage interests and skills and discourage the internet in general. At least if they do decide to transition as adults, that won’t be all they are.

It’s an interesting question. I would focus on mitigating long term damage. Using certain pronouns or a name, hairstyles and fashion do not cause lasting changes but hormones and surgery do. So I would pick my battles with those in mind and try not to alienate the kiddo. I would think it would be important to listen actively to the kid and empathize their pain, but then to gently question on things and research other points of view together. I definitely think people are getting hypnotized but their screens. So a big aspect too would be helping the kid go outside, find a hobby and friends, and stay off the Internet.

[+] [Deleted] 5 points

I'll start by saying that I don't have children, so all I know about teens is from my own life experiences. I also know nothing about psychology and counseling, but I'll give it a go. Would it help to drill down to find the root causes of their dysphoria and then explore how they can overcome these issues without changing their bodies? Reasons could be as simple as how they are being treated and what they see as limitations in themselves or in society that they think can not be changed. I think that's why many people come to terms with their bodies later in life. You either realise that your body was never the limitation, it was your mind, or you adapt and resign yourself to your reality and get on with things.

[–] notyourmother 1 points Edited

Kids with gender dysphoria suffer because of traditionally sexist households and misogynist relatives. The best treatment would be a group home which is closed off from the media, where they learn that individuals have a variety of issues, personalities and interests regardless of their biological sex. Most group homes for the mentally ill youth don't allow access to the internet and are much more progressive/feminist than your average Christian household. I was in a group home as a child, it was almost compareable to a prison, and most of us there were gnc and found that a completely natural thing among each other. This was also because the caregivers there have to be educated a lot about sexism. I have known about one transgender girl that was there and the lesbian staff did shun her for as far they could get away with it.