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This looks pretty interesting.

Teacher is Michael Herbert

https://redflagwalks.wordpress.com/2021/01/08/online-history-course-radical-women-1914-1980/


The course will include the following:

The First World War

We will look at how the war affected women in terms of work and home and also at the activities of women appalled by the carnage of the war who wanted to make sure that it never happened again. They held a Congress in 1915 in Holland which established the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

1920s

We look the post war-war world: work and unemployment; the activities of women’s organisations now that women had the vote eg NUSEC, Six Point Group, Open door Council. We also at the Women Delegation to Ireland and the role of women during and after General Strike in may 1926.

1930s

Britain was plunged into an economic slump after 1929, creating mass unemployment. We look at the role of women in the National Unemployed Workers’ Movement; womenwho fought Mosley’s fascist Blackshirts; and the experiences of women who went to Spain during the Spanish Civil War.

The Second World War

We examine at the profound impact of the war on women’s lives in terms of home and work and how they discussed the war and the future in the Women’s Parliaments. We also look at the work of Labour MP Ellen Wilkinson during the war.

Post war 1945-1951

We look at the career of Ellen Wilkinson as Minster of Education in the Labour government; the housing crisis which led to a squatting movement; and the Royal Commission on Equal Pay.

1950s

We look at the role of women in the developing consumer society; Equal pay; Mary Stott and the Guardian’s women’s page; Peggy Duff and the Camapign for Nuclear Disarmament ; and the career of writer Shelagh Delaney.

1960s

The Pill, mini-skirts, the Permissive Society; but just how much did things really change for women in the 1960s?

Women’s Liberation Movement

We look at the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement, firstly in the USA, and then in Britain, including the Ruskin Conference in 1970s and the first WLM march in March 1971.

A bit about me…

I have been researching writing and teaching the history of radical women for many years ; my pulished work includes Up Then Brave Women”; Manchester’s Radical Women 1819-1918 (2012) and “For the sake of the women who are to come after: Manchester’s Radical Women 1914-1945 (2019)

This looks pretty interesting. Teacher is Michael Herbert https://redflagwalks.wordpress.com/2021/01/08/online-history-course-radical-women-1914-1980/ -------- The course will include the following: The First World War We will look at how the war affected women in terms of work and home and also at the activities of women appalled by the carnage of the war who wanted to make sure that it never happened again. They held a Congress in 1915 in Holland which established the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. 1920s We look the post war-war world: work and unemployment; the activities of women’s organisations now that women had the vote eg NUSEC, Six Point Group, Open door Council. We also at the Women Delegation to Ireland and the role of women during and after General Strike in may 1926. 1930s Britain was plunged into an economic slump after 1929, creating mass unemployment. We look at the role of women in the National Unemployed Workers’ Movement; womenwho fought Mosley’s fascist Blackshirts; and the experiences of women who went to Spain during the Spanish Civil War. The Second World War We examine at the profound impact of the war on women’s lives in terms of home and work and how they discussed the war and the future in the Women’s Parliaments. We also look at the work of Labour MP Ellen Wilkinson during the war. Post war 1945-1951 We look at the career of Ellen Wilkinson as Minster of Education in the Labour government; the housing crisis which led to a squatting movement; and the Royal Commission on Equal Pay. 1950s We look at the role of women in the developing consumer society; Equal pay; Mary Stott and the Guardian’s women’s page; Peggy Duff and the Camapign for Nuclear Disarmament ; and the career of writer Shelagh Delaney. 1960s The Pill, mini-skirts, the Permissive Society; but just how much did things really change for women in the 1960s? Women’s Liberation Movement We look at the emergence of the Women’s Liberation Movement, firstly in the USA, and then in Britain, including the Ruskin Conference in 1970s and the first WLM march in March 1971. A bit about me… I have been researching writing and teaching the history of radical women for many years ; my pulished work includes Up Then Brave Women”; Manchester’s Radical Women 1819-1918 (2012) and “For the sake of the women who are to come after: Manchester’s Radical Women 1914-1945 (2019)

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