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Maybe a stupid question, but does anyone else have trouble growing things in tiny pots? I don't know if it's just a coincidence, or the kinds of plants I've tried... but it seems like I can get things to grow in pots with a 4" diameter just fine... but everything I've tried in my smallest pot (with a 3" diameter and a little under 2.5" depth) has failed to thrive. The things I've put in it have come from little 2" starters.

Do pots this small just not work, even for little succulents? It's such a cute little ceramic pot with a drainage hole, I'd hate to give up on it...

Maybe a stupid question, but does anyone else have trouble growing things in tiny pots? I don't know if it's just a coincidence, or the kinds of plants I've tried... but it seems like I can get things to grow in pots with a 4" diameter just fine... but everything I've tried in my smallest pot (with a 3" diameter and a little under 2.5" depth) has failed to thrive. The things I've put in it have come from little 2" starters. Do pots this small just not work, even for little succulents? It's such a cute little ceramic pot with a drainage hole, I'd hate to give up on it...

17 comments

[–] jelliknight 2 points (+2|-0)

Small pots will always dry out quicker and be more sensitive to changes in temperature. I don't really do cute indoor gardening, so even when I'm starting seeds I've found the best way is to put them in the biggest selfwatering pot I can find and then separate them when I transplant them. When you're buying those mini pots from a nursery, they've all been kept in carefully controlled envrionments. They're just easier to sell when they're already in little individual pots.

You don't necessarily have to give up on your little pot, maybe look for something a bit hardier or look for ways to keep it more consistent with moisture and temp