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5 comments

[–] WholeGrain 6 points (+6|-0)

Whole Article

I. Don't actually see the problem. Considering what weird shit the wealthy could and can do, giving insane amounts of money to ordinary people for their trees is not the worst. Perhaps it sparks some appreciation in nature in some of these super-rich. Perhaps one of them will one day finance a giant nature-reserve and pay money so no one disturbs it.

[–] Nasrin [OP] 4 points (+4|-0) Edited

I'm looking at this from the angle that they're:

  1. Removing old trees that have formed their own mini biome where they're planted.
  2. Hoarding and consolidating plants deemed worthwhile into the hands of a small group at the disadvantage of the local community.
  3. Leading to the further explosion of things like this as people try to get in on the "game":

The high-stakes world of rare-plant theft

Thief ravages Kaneohe greenhouse, stealing rare native Hawaiian plants

Yanked from the ground: cactus theft is ravaging the American desert

Bonsai theft: Japanese couple robbed of 400-year-old tree

Considering what weird shit the wealthy could and can do, giving insane amounts of money to ordinary people for their trees is not the worst.

Solid point! I didn't think of it that way due to the above.

Perhaps one of them will one day finance a giant nature-reserve and pay money so no one disturbs it.

Maybe I'm just bitter, especially so as where I live people steal rare show growing trees and plants often, but isn't that what botanical gardens and nature reserves are already for? When I think of the rich with nature reserves, I think of things like "The Kings Forest". Or do you mean no one could ever enter it including the rich person who set it up?

Food for thought and I appreciate your perspective!

ETA: Fixing links cause I am bad at linking.

[–] WholeGrain 3 points (+3|-0)

Those are some very good points to make. It sounded like they were just buying people's random- but in their mind perfect- trees. Not any specific rare trees, but rather ones with an appealing shape, backing off if they can't buy it:

Others have a sentimental attachment to the tree. “Sometimes they wouldn’t sell it for a million dollars,” he said. “Sometimes their grandmother planted it or they planted it for their dad or something. Those you never get.”

But I can see how it is related.

Ahh a lot of larger nature reserves- I heard, am not 100% knowledgeable on this- are short on staff and often have issues with people just entering like it is a park. But they are too understaffed to do much about it. I feel like a rich dude could finance it well, but that would probably end with different issues.....