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I'm honestly curious about this sudden surge in drag events for children, whether it's story time in libraries or dress-up events.

Are drag queens the new clowns? Is it a quick and easy way for institutions like libraries to appear diverse and woke in a very visible way? Why drag queens specifically?

Is it an attempt at an intentionally challenging image, to present the most visible and garish image of "queerness" alongside children?

I'm not a fan of drag. I think it's misogynistic but I also don't really care what gay men do in their own spaces.

What are your thoughts?

I'm honestly curious about this sudden surge in drag events for children, whether it's story time in libraries or dress-up events. Are drag queens the new clowns? Is it a quick and easy way for institutions like libraries to appear diverse and woke in a very visible way? Why drag queens specifically? Is it an attempt at an intentionally challenging image, to present the most visible and garish image of "queerness" alongside children? I'm not a fan of drag. I think it's misogynistic but I also don't really care what gay men do in their own spaces. What are your thoughts?

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I think it became a thing because a few libraries did it, there was a huge conservative backlash, and then librarians jumped at the chance to own the cons.

There's definitely a thing where one side does something dumb, the other side overreacts and makes it a thing, and then the original side doubles down and starts doing it even MORE because they can. It happens on both sides. It's basically trolling. And then the other side starts saying "see? we had to make a huge deal about this because it really DID spread like wildfire" without acknowledging that their dumb overreaction is part of what made it spread like wildfire in the first place.

I know this take won't be super popular here. I don't like drag at all, let alone DQSH. And I think bringing your kid to it is more likely to wind up being confusing for them than a "learning experience" for tolerance and inclusion. But also, I don't think it's on the same level as socially or medically transitioning your kid. And as long as it's not in schools, I don't mind it being an opt-in program at the library, honestly. I'd love it if the library would host more events that I don't want to go to by people I disagree with. As we move into a more digital era, I think public libraries could really become a space for free exchange of ideas, if they wanted to. Unfortunately, I think they probably won't.