89

I'm honestly curious about this sudden surge in drag events for children, whether it's story time in libraries or dress-up events.

Are drag queens the new clowns? Is it a quick and easy way for institutions like libraries to appear diverse and woke in a very visible way? Why drag queens specifically?

Is it an attempt at an intentionally challenging image, to present the most visible and garish image of "queerness" alongside children?

I'm not a fan of drag. I think it's misogynistic but I also don't really care what gay men do in their own spaces.

What are your thoughts?

I'm honestly curious about this sudden surge in drag events for children, whether it's story time in libraries or dress-up events. Are drag queens the new clowns? Is it a quick and easy way for institutions like libraries to appear diverse and woke in a very visible way? Why drag queens specifically? Is it an attempt at an intentionally challenging image, to present the most visible and garish image of "queerness" alongside children? I'm not a fan of drag. I think it's misogynistic but I also don't really care what gay men do in their own spaces. What are your thoughts?

89 comments

[–] Gladys_Kravitz 16 points Edited

Why not include other children for these kids to interact with? They can share about their lives with other kids who are on their same level.

I don't know how it is in most schools these days, but at my elementary school all of the "different" kids were in separate special ed classes. We never interacted with them, ever.

So why not have a group of diverse children who can just play and be kids together while learning tolerance and empathy for others?

So why not have a group of diverse children who can just play and be kids together while learning tolerance and empathy for others?

Actual diversity doesn't matter because it doesn't make men's weiners hard