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I'm honestly curious about this sudden surge in drag events for children, whether it's story time in libraries or dress-up events.

Are drag queens the new clowns? Is it a quick and easy way for institutions like libraries to appear diverse and woke in a very visible way? Why drag queens specifically?

Is it an attempt at an intentionally challenging image, to present the most visible and garish image of "queerness" alongside children?

I'm not a fan of drag. I think it's misogynistic but I also don't really care what gay men do in their own spaces.

What are your thoughts?

I'm honestly curious about this sudden surge in drag events for children, whether it's story time in libraries or dress-up events. Are drag queens the new clowns? Is it a quick and easy way for institutions like libraries to appear diverse and woke in a very visible way? Why drag queens specifically? Is it an attempt at an intentionally challenging image, to present the most visible and garish image of "queerness" alongside children? I'm not a fan of drag. I think it's misogynistic but I also don't really care what gay men do in their own spaces. What are your thoughts?

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I honestly think the people doing this are homophobes who are trying to virtue signal that they are gay allies. If their goal was really to help normalize homosexuality, they'd just bring in a normal gay man (or lesbian woman, gasp!). Just a regular gay person who talks about their life for a bit and then mentions that they're gay, introducing kids to the fact that there are lots of gay people around and they are just like anyone else regardless of who they're attracted to. Instead, when these "wokesters" think of a gay man, their first thought is "drag queen"? Some of these kids have never, as far as they know, met a gay person before, so it seems pretty toxic that what may be their first introduction to a gay man is seeing a man doing an adult entertainment act where he's caricaturizing a woman. Why would this be how you want children to see gay people? A boy questioning if he is gay might, after "drag queen story hour," be more hesitant now that he thinks being gay involves this level of performance or "queerness," rather than knowing that whichever sex(es) he ends up being attracted to has nothing to do with his personality.

This is a good point. If this is a child's first encounter with gay folks (or even the concept of homosexuality), its going to leave a VERY bizarre, bad impression on them. Instead of being taught that gay people are just like everyone else, they're being taught that all gay men are flamboyant clowns (and that lesbians apparently don't exist because being "queer" is ALL ABOUT MEN). Which will likely cause quite a bit of confusion for kids who grow up to be homosexual, but would rather stay in the closet because they want no part of "queer" clownery