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[–] BlackCirce 🔮🐖🐖🐖 4 points

It isn’t even the fact that there are men out there who are happy to behave in such a depraved way – we’ve known that for quite some time.

Out where?

No, it’s the fact that his school defended him, and what’s more that it defended him on the grounds of respecting ‘gender identity and gender expression’.

The ultimate “gender expression” is men violating the boundaries and dignity of women and children for their own benefit and pleasure. Society has always pretended to be helpless in the face of male sexuality, and placed the onus on individual women and children to ineffectually escape or avoid what we know is “out there.”

The Kayla Lemieux incident is a real, legitimate, gender expression, it’s the dominant male behaving as he pleases and saying “well what are you going to do about it” and the subordinate individuals cringing in fear of him and appeasing him and wringing their hands or seeing an opportunity to align themselves with his power.

This is not a new game. What’s new is that the sexual misconduct is clearly visible for everyone around the world, no one can deny it or brush it away because there’s no convenient victim to blame, slander, interrogate, disappear, shame or mock. If someone could figure out a way to blame what this man is doing on a student, especially a female one, they would. But they can’t, so they have to accept what they’re seeing: a male exhibitionist practicing his autogynephilic exhibitionism at his professional job as a teacher and the school supporting him.

There have always been weirdos in society – what’s new in the 21st century is the willingness of so many institutions to validate weirdos.

There have always been weirdos perverted, sexual entitled men in society – what’s [not] new in the 21st century is the willingness of so many institutions to validate weirdos perverted, sexually entitled men.

There have always been weirdos in society – what’s new in the 21st century is the willingness of so many institutions to validate weirdos.

This is a side effect of the way many of our youth grew up online. They grew up exposed to pornography and kinks as a matter of course, from the ages of ~10 onwards.

Their exposures to porn and kinks was on the terms of the people making the porn or posting the explicit material, so their viewpoint of "don't yuck my yum" was firmly ingrained in these kids' worldview as a rule that must be respected.

All socialization that kids partake in shapes their views of what is allowed and not allowed, what the unspoken laws are, what is important and what isn't. This past generation has grown up entirely online and yet unprotected from those viewpoints - often having their first sexual experiences online too, which is hugely formative.

Kids now resist reframing these experiences as abuse, because doing so would mean having to unlearn a lot of toxic material and behavior.