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Only around 13% of TIMs remove the big D according to this : https://archive.ph/gJXIl

TIFs are even less likely to having had bottom surgery at only about 3%!

Only around 13% of TIMs remove the big D according to this : https://archive.ph/gJXIl TIFs are even less likely to having had bottom surgery at only about 3%!

28 comments

Yep, I believe it. I think TRAs persistently believe that most TIMs get it done or are planning on getting it done. If they can't afford it, they'll scamper around looking apologetic and sweet, hoping they'll pass anyway, and gosh, wouldn't be it be mean to tell a sweet thing like her to get out of the ladies' room?

Regarding OP TIF's post, many more of them need to hear it. I'm still haunted by that story of a TIF who was raped in a cab and kept repeating "I'm a man, I'm a man" as if dictating her version of reality would deter him

The 13% figure is an overcount. Fewer than 5% of TIMs remove their dicks and balls.

Have you got references we can use when discussing this elsewhere?

[–] ProxyMusic 2 points Edited

When researchers at Emory University did an online survey of TIPs in 2012-13, only 11 of the 234 TIMs who responded said they had undergone genital surgery. That's 4.7%.

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/trgh.2016.0013

An examination of the electronic medical records of TIP patients at a Boston HCF between 2010 and 2015 found that of the 73 TIMs,

27.8% had a history of gender-affirming procedures, with 8.3% undergoing breast augmentation, 6.9% undergoing vaginoplasty, 2.8% undergoing facial feminization, 2.8% undergoing orchiectomy without vaginoplasty, and 12.5% undergoing other gender-affirming procedures (i.e., other implants or electrolysis).

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/trgh.2017.0028

This paper says 5-13% of TIMs have had genital surgeries, but the data it is based comes mostly from self-reported information given in anonymous online surveys. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6626314/

A study that used insurance claim data in the USA for medical care of 122 million unique individuals who had medical care paid for by insurance from 2009 through 2015 found:

A total of 7,905 transgender patients in the Truven MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database were identified using the GID diagnosis code

A total of 1,047 patients, or 13.2% of the sample [with the GID diagnosis] underwent 1 or more gender-affirming surgeries from 2009 to 2015, with the number of patients undergoing surgeries increasing over the sample period (Fig. ​(Fig.4).4). There were a total of 401 mastectomies, 60 phalloplasties, 189 hysterectomies, 62 breast augmentations,193 vaginoplasties and 93 orchiectomies in the sample. Mastectomy was the most common procedure represented within the sample, accounting for 11.7% of all procedures. Phalloplasty was the least common procedure, accounting for 5.7% of all surgical cases.

193 vaginoplasties and 93 orchiectomies over 6 years is a very low number.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977951/

A retrospective chart review of 99 transgender patients was performed at the Endocrinology Clinic at Boston Medical Center, an urban safety net hospital. The records for 99 transgender subjects who received treatment between 2004–2015, including 28 transmen and 71 transwomen, were examined. The outcome measures were the types of medical interventions chosen by transgender patients, which included hormone therapy, chest surgery, gonadectomy, genital surgery, and facial surgery.

Results: Thirty-five percent of subjects had undergone at least one gender-affirming surgery. Transmen were more likely to have had surgery than transwomen (54% vs. 28%). Twenty-five percent of patients had chest surgery, 13% had genital surgery or gonadectomy, and 8% had facial surgery.

Conclusion: In 2015, a majority of transgender endocrinology clinic patients had not undergone any type of gender-affirmation surgery. Among those who did elect to have a surgery, genital surgery or gonadectomy were uncommon. The low rate of surgery among this sample of transgender patients may be attributable to the financial cost, lack of interest in surgery, or that genital surgery is not a high priority for transgender individuals relative to surgery to change visible features such as face and chest.

https://www.endocrinepractice.org/article/S1530-891X(20)35786-4/fulltext

Many transgender and gender diverse people undergo myriad medical and surgical interventions to affirm their gender identity, including hormone therapies, chest reconstruction, hysterectomy, genital surgeries, and breast augmentation. But a significant number of transgender and gender diverse people do not undergo any medical or surgical interventions. This makes it impossible for clinicians to know which organs a person has without asking the patient and reviewing their health records.

https://fenwayhealth.org/new-paper-provides-strategies-for-optimizing-gender-affirming-medical-care-by-changing-electronic-health-records/

In this descriptive observational study from 2000 to 2014, data were analyzed from the National Inpatient Sample, a representative pool of inpatient visits across the United States. The initial analyses were done from June to August 2015. Patients of interest were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis codes for transsexualism or gender identity disorder. Subanalysis focused on patients with procedure codes for surgery related to gender affirmation.

The NIS collects inpatient health record information from approximately 1000 hospitals per year across a varied number of states, with 46 states represented in 2011. The total pool of hospitals is considered representative of 95% of the US population.

This study included 37 827 encounters (median [interquartile range] patient age, 38 [26-49] years) identified by a diagnosis code of transsexualism or gender identity disorder.

Of all encounters, 4118 (10.9%) involved gender-affirming surgery.

The following procedures were considered to be gender affirming among transgender patients who were transitioning from male to female (MtF): bilateral orchiectomy (code 62.41), amputation of penis (code 64.3), vaginal construction (code 70.61), vaginal construction with graft or prosthesis (code 70.63), bilateral breast augmentation (code 85.52), and bilateral breast implant (code 85.54). The following operations were considered to be gender affirming among transgender patients transitioning from female to male (FtM): bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (codes 65.61 and 65.63), obliteration and total excision of vagina (code 70.4), total bilateral salpingectomy (code 66.51), operations on clitoris (code 71.4), vulvectomy (code 71.62), total hysterectomy (codes 68.4x and 68.5x), testicular prosthesis (code 62.7), construction of penis (code 64.43), bilateral extended mastectomy (code 85.48), and bilateral mastectomy (codes 85.42, 85.44, and 85.46). Code 64.5 refers to operations for sex change that are not classified elsewhere. Only patients who were 18 years or older were included in our analysis

The incidence of genital surgery increased over time: in 2000-2005, 72.0% of patients who underwent gender-affirming procedures had genital surgery; in 2006-2011, 83.9% of patients who underwent gender-affirming procedures had genital surgery.

Unfortunately, this paper doesn't break down the genital surgeries any further, so there's no way to tell how many were on the reproductive organs of males and how many were on females.

When referring to the sex category, the NIS data use the following 4 discrete variables: male, female, inconsistent, or missing. Inconsistent refers to individuals whose sex as seen on their medical record does not match a procedure that they are receiving,17 such as a male patient who is undergoing a hysterectomy. In these situations, the ICD-9 procedure code in question is also recoded as inconsistent. Because we only included patients who had a diagnosis code of TS or GID, we assumed that the inconsistent surgical procedure would refer to patients undergoing gender-affirming surgery who had a sex variable in their medical record that was not compatible with their procedure. Therefore, an FtM transgender patient who had modified his sex to male on his medical record and was undergoing a hysterectomy is classified as having an inconsistent surgical procedure and is considered to have undergone genital gender-affirming surgery in our analysis.

Given the size of the US population, and the TIP population, 4,118 "gender-affirming surgeries" done in US hospitals over a 14 year span seems to be a very small number. That's an average of 294 surgeries each year, 72-84% of which involved removal of gonads and reproductive organs. My hunch is that the bulk of these surgeries were on females, because all the evidence is that TIFs get surgeries at much higher rates than TIMs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5875299/

There is a steady rise in the number of sex change surgeries being performed annually, with a total 8304 in 2017 to a total of 9576 in 2018, with 2885 of male to female surgeries and 6691 of female to male surgeries.

https://journals.lww.com/cur/fulltext/2021/03000/transgender_surgery___knowledge_gap_among.12.aspx

Although the number of TIPs in the USA is now estimated to be more than 1.5 million, trans-friendly researchers found the number of surgeons in the US who do any of the three main "gender affirming genital surgeries" - vaginoplasty, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty - to be quite small:

In the United States, 1.4–1.65 million people identify as transgender, many of whom will seek genital gender-affirming surgery (GAS). The number of surgeons, geographic proximity thereof, and exclusionary insurance policies has limited patient access to genital GAS.

Aim: To assess the accessibility of both feminizing and masculinizing genital GAS (vaginoplasty, metoidioplasty, and phalloplasty) by identifying the location of GAS surgeons, health insurance, or payment forms accepted.

Methods: Between February and April 2018, genital GAS surgeons were identified via Google search. Surgeons’ offices were contacted by telephone or e-mail.

Results: We identified 96 surgeons across 64 individual medical centers offering genital GAS. The survey response rate was 83.3%. Only 61 of 80 (76.3%) surgeons across 38 of 53 (72%) locations confirmed offering genital GAS. Only 20 (40%) U.S. states had at least one genital GAS provider.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S205011612030115X

USA's CDC reported in 2021 that:

The majority of transgender women have not undergone genital-affirmation surgery and therefore might retain a functional penis; in these instances, they might engage in insertive oral, vaginal, or anal sex as well as receptive oral or anal sex. In the U.S. Transgender Survey [of anonymous persons who completed it online in 2015], 12% of [the respondents claiming to be] transgender women [said they] had undergone vaginoplasty surgery...

A systematic review and meta-analysis of HIV infection among transgender women estimated that HIV prevalence in the United States is 14% among transgender women, with the highest prevalence among Black (44%) and Hispanic (26%) transgender women (344). Data also demonstrate high rates of HIV infection among transgender women worldwide (345). Bacterial STI prevalence varies among transgender women and is based largely on convenience samples. Despite limited data, international and U.S. studies have indicated elevated incidence and prevalence of gonorrhea and chlamydia among transgender women similar to rates among cisgender MSM [men who have sex with men](346–348). A recent study using data from the STD Surveillance Network revealed that the proportions of transgender women with extragenital chlamydial or gonococcal infections were similar to those of cisgender MSM (349).

Translation: most TIMs keep their dicks and balls, and they have the same rates of STIs as gay men - but much, much higher rates of HIV than gay men.

https://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment-guidelines/trans.htm

Brazil has a huge number of TIMs, many of them poor. The leading hospital there that treats them did a total of 214 penile inversion "vaginoplasties" over a 20 year period, so 10-11 a year:

Since 1998, the Gender Identity Program (PROTIG) of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil has provided public assistance to transsexual people, is the first one in Brazil and one of the pioneers in South America.

Between January of 2000 and March of 2020, a total of 214 patients underwent penile inversion vaginoplasty.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsurg.2021.639430/full

Most performed procedures: Trans men vs trans women

Gender affirmation procedures are not a one-size-fits-all option. Procedures ranging from in-patient to outpatient, as well as those that involve one area or a collection of procedures performed at once across one or more areas – similar to a mommy makeover – all fall under the gender confirmation umbrella.

Data from ASPS focused on three main gender affirmation surgery categories for both trans men and trans women: facial refinement, body contouring of the breast or chest area and genitalia reconstruction. Trans male patients seeking a breast or chest surgical procedure saw the highest increase, with a 15 percent jump from 2019 to 2020, closely followed by trans female patients who underwent facial and breast or chest procedures, charting a 14 percent increase in 2020.

It shouldn't be considered surprising that there are double-digit increases for gender confirmation surgery during a pandemic, either, according to Chicago-based plastic surgeon and ASPS member Loren Schechter, MD, who specializes in gender confirmation procedures.

Most performed procedures: Trans men vs trans women

Gender affirmation procedures are not a one-size-fits-all option. Procedures ranging from in-patient to outpatient, as well as those that involve one area or a collection of procedures performed at once across one or more areas – similar to a mommy makeover – all fall under the gender confirmation umbrella.

Data from ASPS [American Society of Plastic Surgeons] focused on three main gender affirmation surgery categories for both trans men and trans women: facial refinement, body contouring of the breast or chest area and genitalia reconstruction.

Trans male patients [so females] seeking a breast or chest surgical procedure saw the highest increase, with a 15 percent jump from 2019 to 2020, closely followed by trans female patients [males] who underwent facial and breast or chest procedures, charting a 14 percent increase in 2020.

It shouldn't be considered surprising that there are double-digit increases for gender confirmation surgery during a pandemic, either, according to Chicago-based plastic surgeon and ASPS member Loren Schechter, MD, who specializes in gender confirmation procedures.

Even in procedures that saw a decrease, such as the 7 percent dip in male bottom surgeries, Dr. Schechter maintains that was more than likely due to medical limits posed by the pandemic. The average plastic surgery practice shutdown time was about eight weeks in 2020.

"I think the procedures that were more outpatient, like chest surgeries, facial surgeries, breast augmentations, saw an increase," Dr. Schechter says.

UCLA plastic surgeon and ASPS member, Justine Lee, MD, who specializes in facial gender affirmation, noticed an uptick in recent cases.

https://www.plasticsurgery.org/news/articles/american-society-of-plastic-surgeons-releases-first-ever-facial-breast/chest-and-genital-data-for-gender-affirmation-procedures

According to this literature review: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6626314/ , 5-13% of TIMs have had genital surgery. But it's only as good as the data, and as far as I know there is no current, authoritative source for this measure.

Most of the underlying "data" in that paper comes from the anonymous online survey of TIPs, or people pretending to be TIPs whilst filling out the survey, in the US conducted and published by the Williams Institute (TRA propaganda mill) in 2015. The survey itself is a mess.

Also, the paper itself presents different figures in the same paragraph that you referenced.

Genital GCS is generally less common than chest surgery, with prevalence rates of about 25–50% for transgender men and 5–10% for transgender women (7,9,32). For transgender women, genital GCS comprises a number of procedures, including vaginoplasty (most commonly intestinal or penile inversion) with labiaplasty and/or clitoroplasty, penectomy, and orchiectomy. Transgender women [self] report bottom surgery at rates between 5–13%.

Considering the steep rise in the number of TIMs in the past few years, I think 13% is rather much.

There is no logical reason why the number of males who are disordered enough to mutilate themselves (especially the part of themselves they love most) should have risen so suddenly.

Porn addiction is a problem, but I don't think it can cause such profound mental illness as to lead to self-mutilation in that many men.

We all know that most TIMs are in it for the fetish and for the invasion of womens' spaces. The number of HSTS TIMs with internalized homophobia is likely to be lower than ever, seeing as most countries where TIMs are a thing are (or used to be ...) tolerant of homosexuality before the homophobic gender ideology gained traction.

(TIFs and their self-mutilation is a very different thing - girls are groomed into self-hatred early on, so the numbers of girls now getting their healthy breasts removed is not that unusual, sadly. Women's relationship with their bodies was always very different from men's love for their penis.)

most countries where TIMs are a thing are (or used to be ...) tolerant of homosexuality

Like Iran?

Most, not all.

Iran is an exception.

The US, UK, Ireland, Sweden ... many countries who have drunk the koolaid legalized gay marriage shortly before leaping on trans insanity.

And there's a theory that transnonsense is what homosexuality charities jumped upon once they were basically out of a job.

Iran is a special case, even though it does highlight the homophobia of trans ideology.

(One might also count the US where despite a lot of tolerance for homosexuals in some areas, there's also religious fundies who'd rather trans their children than admit they're homosexual.)

At this point I'd be surprised if it was as much as 13%. And nearly all the TIMs who get their junk made into a fauxgina seem to be the gay (or bi) men who want to be fucked by other, hopefully "straight", men. The het males who only want to be with women, preferably and more specifically lesbians, nearly all keep their junk.

Not that true. A lot of HSTS know deep down its a facade and keep the dick because they know they have to go for the gays. AGP are aroused by mutilation, so some of them get it.

For what it's worth, I know two "transbians" who both got the snip.

Unusual. Do they also go for men (including other "transbians") now that they have front holes? That seems to be fairly common with the "transbians". Especially since they find out that still no lesbians want them even without their dicks.

[–] notapatsy 2 points Edited

I thought the term "front hole"(a term I find disgusting, objectifying, and misogynistic) was pushed by trans-identified females so as not to trigger them about their biological sex whileTIMs refer to their surgically reconstructed genitals as "vaginas."

I'd be surprised if as many as 13% of TIMs mutilate their genitals - note that the redditor who says this speaks vaguely of "surveys" without provided references for any actual studies.

Of course they don't get rid of their genitals. Their new boobies + their old junk = better/easier masturbation.

Considering how many people identify as trans these days that's still far too many doctors eagerly committing medical malpractice.