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Here's the ranting prompt. https://imgur.com/fIr8XlV

Here's the rant: If I didn't peak by randomly watching Nikkie Tutorials 'coming out' video, then 'Elliot' Page's interview would have definitely peaked me.

I peaked because Nikkie said he always knew he was a woman because he always liked 'wearing pink, and dolls, and whatnot". Then I did some digging around the word terf and whoopsie a baby terf was born. Glad to have found you.

Anyways, this Eliot Page coming out thing... Here's what I got thrown at me in my youth " You drink from a glass like a man, you ride a bicycle like a man (???), you never want to wear high heels, why don't you let your hair grow, be more like a girl, you can't be a mechanic that's a man's job, why are you sitting like a man?, a woman with short hair??? are you sure you are a woman?, you only buy/wear pants... " to name a few.

The only time I 'wanted' to be a man was when I was about 4-5 years old and I wanted the convenience of peeing while standing up. That's it. Over the years I've never felt drawn to stereotypes of what it means to be a woman, and even though I was behaving unconventionally and even though everyone around me told me I'm not 'lady like", I stuck to it. I knew I was a woman, I can't exaggerate this one loud enough. I never gave into anything stereotypical of my sex, but even though I was wearing baggy clothes, even though I had 0 make up on I still experienced misogyny, I've experienced sexual assault when I was 18 while idly staring at my computer screen wearing a hoodie.

So, I just want to thank Ellen Page for 'opening' my eyes by telling me that I was a man all along. Freaking sellout.

Here's the ranting prompt. https://imgur.com/fIr8XlV Here's the rant: If I didn't peak by randomly watching Nikkie Tutorials 'coming out' video, then 'Elliot' Page's interview would have definitely peaked me. I peaked because Nikkie said he always knew he was a woman because he always liked 'wearing pink, and dolls, and whatnot". Then I did some digging around the word terf and whoopsie a baby terf was born. Glad to have found you. Anyways, this Eliot Page coming out thing... Here's what I got thrown at me in my youth " You drink from a glass like a man, you ride a bicycle like a man (???), you never want to wear high heels, why don't you let your hair grow, be more like a girl, you can't be a mechanic that's a man's job, why are you sitting like a man?, a woman with short hair??? are you sure you are a woman?, you only buy/wear pants... " to name a few. The only time I 'wanted' to be a man was when I was about 4-5 years old and I wanted the convenience of peeing while standing up. That's it. Over the years I've never felt drawn to stereotypes of what it means to be a woman, and even though I was behaving unconventionally and even though everyone around me told me I'm not 'lady like", I stuck to it. I knew I was a woman, I can't exaggerate this one loud enough. I never gave into anything stereotypical of my sex, but even though I was wearing baggy clothes, even though I had 0 make up on I still experienced misogyny, I've experienced sexual assault when I was 18 while idly staring at my computer screen wearing a hoodie. So, I just want to thank Ellen Page for 'opening' my eyes by telling me that I was a man all along. Freaking sellout.

69 comments

[–] Banshee 15 points (+15|-0) Edited

While there are many things I despise about transgenderism, TRAs targeting tomboys is one of the things that I find most personally offensive.

When I was I child I liked both feminine and masculine clothes and toys. When I was a teenager, I was a firm tomboy. I enjoyed baggy t-shirts, cargo pants and combat boots. The only skirt I owned was the one I had to wear for special school ceremonies (I was a model student, so I obeyed the dress code). I didn't wear make-up and I listened exclusively to rock music. In my 20s I balanced out again and to this day I would say I'm 50% feminine, 50% masculine. None of this makes me any less of a woman.

But then, I'm sure that if I was in the libfem environment, there would be someone who tried to convince me I'm genderfluid (or some other weird term) and should start using some funny pronouns.

TRAs love their gender stereotypes so much that sometimes it's hard for me to see the difference between them and patriarchy.

TRAs love their gender stereotypes so much that sometimes it's hard for me to see the difference between them and patriarchy.

They ARE the patriarchy.