98

Recently it's become popular for young people to fake disassociative identity disorder, Tourette's syndrome, ADHD, and even autism online. I'm usually hesitant to accuse anyone of faking disability, because so many of them are invisible, but the videos they post of themselves on YouTube and TikTok are so obviously fake that it's insulting.

But something I've noticed is that a lot of people doing this are also trans identified, especially TIFs who identify as male or nonbinary. (For example, their "alternate personalities" all have different genders and ridiculous pronouns to match.) It's like they didn't get enough attention for transitioning so they have to look for it in other ways, specifically with crazy hairstyles, makeup, and fake disorders. A lot of them quite literally identify as fictional characters or have their symptoms perfectly match up to the latest popular audio on TikTok.

And it's always the disorders with symptoms they can have fun faking. No one's making glamorized instagram edits about Crohn's disease or IBS or whatever. It's infuriating that these ableist little shitheads are treating debilitating, life-altering conditions like costumes. It's the exact same way they talk about gender, as well, and I hate it.

Recently it's become popular for young people to fake disassociative identity disorder, Tourette's syndrome, ADHD, and even autism online. I'm usually hesitant to accuse anyone of faking disability, because so many of them are invisible, but the videos they post of themselves on YouTube and TikTok are so obviously fake that it's insulting. But something I've noticed is that a lot of people doing this are also trans identified, especially TIFs who identify as male or nonbinary. (For example, their "alternate personalities" all have different genders and ridiculous pronouns to match.) It's like they didn't get enough attention for transitioning so they have to look for it in other ways, specifically with crazy hairstyles, makeup, and fake disorders. A lot of them quite literally identify as fictional characters or have their symptoms perfectly match up to the latest popular audio on TikTok. And it's always the disorders with symptoms they can have fun faking. No one's making glamorized instagram edits about Crohn's disease or IBS or whatever. It's infuriating that these ableist little shitheads are treating debilitating, life-altering conditions like costumes. It's the exact same way they talk about gender, as well, and I hate it.

91 comments

[–] LOriginedumonde 63 points (+63|-0) Edited

I’m a bit baked so I’m sorry if this makes no sense but I have a theory that as the world becomes more populated and competition becomes exceedingly fierce due to capitalism, people, especially the younger generations that are just getting their footing will latch onto anything that can make themselves stand out and feel special while also providing them with a sense of belonging. It’s a lot easier to claim a ‘trendy’ disorder or unconventional identity than it is to put in the hard work to distinguish yourself from others in a positive and self fulfilling way.

[–] Failed_Furniture 32 points (+32|-0)

Meghan Murphy had a guest on one of her podcasts years ago that said something about how transgenderism gives young people the opportunity to concurrently be a special snowflake and have a group to fit into. She put it more diplomatically than that, but the essence of idea has always stuck with me.

[–] Danu 13 points (+13|-0) Edited

The population of Earth has more than doubled since 1970. DOUBLED.

It's basically impossible to be unique when there's almost 8 billion other people here. It's like (mostly younger) people are going through some sort of denial, raging against the scary fact that as an individual you aren't special at all. I honestly think these gender identities and random sexual orientations are a sad attempt at creating a special category, a chance to be unique.

The saddest part is, they are just often just conforming to the latest trends and confirming that fact that trying to be special, unique is just a waste of time & energy.

[–] Every-Man-His-Own-Football 11 points (+11|-0) Edited

Identity as a branding exercise. I recently read an article titled "Top 10 branding exercises" and it applied very well to trans identities. Maybe I can find it again. EDIT: https://diymarketers.com/branding-exercises-to-attract-customer/

[–] drdee 9 points (+9|-0)

World's most boring book title, but a really enlightening book about how normal human values had to change to align with the needs of industrial capitalism. The author points out that in the early 20th century as it became clearer and clearer that industrial capitalism wasn't delivering the goods for most people, and that 'if you work hard you'll succeed' was a lie, lots of 'psychologists' started popping up explaining that you need to have 'that special something' in order to succeed.

https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/W/bo18221315.html

[–] BogHag 3 points (+3|-0)

The Work Ethic In Industrial America 1850-1920

I'm gonna see if there's an audiobook. Thanks for the suggestion!

[–] SapphoFinn 4 points (+4|-0)

I think you're pretty much right on this.

I felt this when like, the furry movement started happening - people wanted to be unique and belong to a group of people and they often didn't seem to belong to many groups if any at all. This feels like another instance of that, or multiple instances anyway. I mean, if you pretend to have DID you get to put on a mask whenever you feel its convenient - maybe you're too scared to be the bold and confident person but you can hide behind a fake DID personality and achieve that. Then the whole, people pitying you probably feels nice 'cause the 'attention' is on you. And of course you are now part of that 'community' and have the benefits of being in a community like that - support, friendship etc.

And again like you said - actually bettering yourself and putting the time or effort in to being something more than average (nothing wrong with average) - that can be difficult.

[–] heartwitch 3 points (+3|-0) Edited

I think you are probably right. But I also think that in some cases, adopting a fake condition may be a way of giving up on the competition.

Existing in a society is difficult, and the one I'm in, the United States, is particularly bad about demanding a certain kind of personality. Basically the message I've got from spending my adult life here is that if you're not good with people, high-energy, and passionate about working, your chances of having a decent job are slim to none (because there's always going to be some go-getter who can do the networking and the job better). So that's fairly dispiriting and it leads to two conclusions: either a) I'm going to have to transform my personality to survive, or b) I have an insoluble problem and I need help. Which is where the exaggerated symptoms come in. If I can get a diagnosis like autism, now it's not a personal failing, it's a condition. It explains everything! I don't need to change. I have given myself permission to fail. And because I picked a trendy condition, I have a built-in community for emotional support, possibly financial support. The fact that I don't actually have the condition isn't a barrier, because it's really easy to "develop" a condition simply by reading about symptoms and hanging out with people who have it.

I think this is similar to what you and the replies are saying, except that I, speaking as myself now not as hypothetical faker, firmly believe that the drive to distinguish yourself, to do better, to excel or perish under capitalism, is horribly inhumane and should be rejected. Nothing wrong with being average -- except when you literally cannot find a fucking job by being average.

[–] goneharolding 31 points (+50|-19)

I’m starting to think ‘non-binary’ is a self-selecting label for borderline personality disorder 😒

[–] its_levio_SAH 31 points (+43|-12)

Hey, some of us borderlines have gotten therapy and done the work to control our impulses and get our shit together. I don't like this comment much. Not everyone who suffers from BPD is an attention-starved psycho.

[–] actualdyke 16 points (+25|-9)

seconded. BPD is so often misunderstood and boiled down to just attention seeking and comments like this don't help that stigma.

Man as a Borderline who hates attention and is awkward as fuck around people I don’t know, I never knew attention seeking was associated with it. Thought that was histrionic personality

[–] platypus 12 points (+13|-1)

I'm not borderline but I see the way "borderline" is thrown around as an accusation against "difficult" women. I agree with you.

[–] its_levio_SAH 2 points (+2|-0)

It's so frustrating to see comments like these. The people saying they've had their lives ruined by borderline frustrate me. No, "a borderline" didn't almost ruin your life. A person did. These comments insinuate that all people with BPD have the same symptoms and behavior and that's just flat out not true. Makes me sad to see women cutting me down because of a mental illness that was created by the intense trauma I've suffered. Like punch up people, not down.

[–] goneharolding 0 points (+1|-1)

I was aware of this before I posted this glib response. But I forgot that the defining feature of BPD was an inability to say, ‘oh, they can’t mean me’ and move on with your day.

If you are a lovely person, I have nothing bad to say to you. And if you’re not NB, this bad joke was definitely not aimed at you 👍

[–] DonKarnage 28 points (+34|-6)

I agree, but not just bpd. I think cluster b types have taken quite an advantage of the gender movement. It gives them a reason to be openly awful to others, treated and coddled like a special baby, claim victimhood out of thin air, and have all of their emotional whims validated.

Anyone who has ever had long term exposure to cluster b types knows how they roll, and they do have a tendency towards diagnosing themselves with multiple disorders/disabilities/illnesses for attention and validation.

I wish that there was more research put into cluster b types and their traits and behavior. That way those of us who were raised by, brought up in a household with multiple cluster b relatives, or had long term relationships with, who know exactly what they do, and how they act, wouldn't be dismissed so easily.

Also, I understand that there are bpd's here who are aware of their disorder, that take offense to comments like these. However, they should understand that there are also some of us who have been dragged through the goddamn mud and traumatized by bpd's. Some of us whose lives have been damn near ruined by bpd's, myself included, so excuse me for not tiptoeing around you. As a long term abuse survivor, I look at this NB shit and see npd/bpd written all over it. If you are doing the work to help yourself, then you should understand that it's not the same case for every bpd out there, so why get upset when others point out the similarities between bpd's and NBs (kind of like when women say "ugh men!" and men rush in to scream "not all men!!!!!" You're doing the same thing). Every time someone here mentions bpd's, a bpd will rush in to scream at them and complain, which to me is very on point with bpd behavior. I don't care how much I get downvoted for pointing that out. All I can say is sorry that I'm an abuse survivor who suffered greatly at the hands of bpd's, npd's and sociopaths that I simply refuse to tiptoe, coddle you or take your shit.

[–] immersang 14 points (+16|-2)

However, they should understand that there are also some of us who have been dragged through the goddamn mud and traumatized by bpd's. Some of us whose lives have been damn near ruined by bpd's, myself included, so excuse me for not tiptoeing around you.

Seconded.

(kind of like when women say "ugh men!" and men rush in to scream "not all men!!!!!" You're doing the same thing)

Indeed, well put.

[–] Jinera 7 points (+9|-2)

Yes I feel like that's very important. Many have been hurt very badly by BPD's.

[–] actualdyke 3 points (+7|-4)

it's evident that you're projecting a lot of hurt and unhealed issues onto strangers you've never met online, But I do think it's rather unfair to compare us to 'not all men', lump us in with sociopaths (even though that's a whole different cluster, not that you care) and accuse us of 'screaming and complaining' when all we're doing is pointing out that stereotyping mental illnesses isn't a great thing to do. hope you get the help you need.

[–] DonKarnage 3 points (+3|-0)

it's evident that you're projecting a lot of hurt and unhealed issues onto strangers you've never met online,

Oh god, sick! Just fucking sick! The way you feel that you need to be condescending towards an abuse survivor and dismiss the abuse. Good god, I swear. And this is exactly what I mean, lol! On par.

I never thought I would need to block anyone on ovarit, but shit. I don't want to hear anything else you have to say after that apologist mess of a reply. On par indeed! Bless your heart, dear, and goodbye.

And sociopath IS apart of cluster b. It has recently been placed within the traits of ASPD, which is a cluster b type. Not that you'd care....

[–] its_levio_SAH 0 points (+1|-1)

Every time someone here mentions bpd's, a bpd will rush in to scream at them and complain, which to me is very on point with bpd behavior

I'm sorry, where did I rush in to scream and complain?

[–] actualdyke 13 points (+20|-7)

if you're going to go around diagnosing anyone you dislike with a personality disorder at least get it right - 'nonbinary' people are much more narcissistic than anything. then again, we could also consider the fact that they are just manipulative entitled spoiled adult children, and not being irrelevant mental illnesses into it at all! just a thought!

[–] no- 6 points (+10|-4)

Trisha Paytas and Demi Lovato agree.

[–] proudcatlady -3 points (+2|-5)

Both of them were horrifically abused but go off, they’re stupid cluster Bs who deserve no compassion

[–] no- 3 points (+3|-0)

I never said they deserve no compassion, I'm not making fun of them.

[–] Tovasshi 2 points (+2|-0)

Histrionic Personality Disorder, actually.

It's not as well known, but it does fit more accurately than the other cluster B disorders.

Load more (1 comment)
[–] crispycherrypie 29 points (+29|-0)

For autism in particular, it's nothing new to pretend to have it for attention online. People were doing it in the aughts, and they're still doing it now. It's the costume of people who have absolutely no problems in their lives, and it's exhausting.

[–] WombatRose 29 points (+29|-0)

It bothers me so much. My son is autistic - nonverbal, not toilet trained, will put his head through a wall if his routine changes. To see people treat it like a fun little quirk that just means they are a bit socially awkward makes me rage.

[–] its_levio_SAH 17 points (+18|-1)

Same. I have an autistic relative who will never learn how to drive, live on his own, get a "normal" job, and it's unlikely he will ever have a romantic relationship.

A girl I went to high school with who is a huge hypochondriac has recently decided she's autistic. Yeah, she's socially awkward and definitely mentally ill but not autistic. I want to tell her to spend a day with my relative and then come back and talk to me about how disabled she is.

She's that annoying type who posts lots of preachy bullshit on social media. Most of her posts begin with "Attention neurotypicals" followed by a long blab about how something something was offensive and ableist and neurotypicals are ignorant dicks.

It's exhausting and maddening.

[–] crispycherrypie 13 points (+13|-0)

I'm on the spectrum myself and it just fills me with rage that they've decided that my lifelong disability is quirky and fun.

It's really, really not.

They’re performing a caricature of what they think we’re like and I find it disgusting. I’ve worked so hard to have a “normal” life and it’s less likely than ever I’d disclose to anyone now because of these clowns.

[–] Calais 4 points (+5|-1)

Where I live, Autism and similar disorders are handed out like candy, because it absolves the people around the diagnosed child of having to put work into accommodating PTSD, temporary depression, or other circumstantial problems like bullying or child abuse. Some of these may develop into severely worse things if left untreated.

It's to the point where I flat out do not believe a person who claims to have such a disorder if it comes up early in conversation in an unrelated way. Not because I don't think such people really do exist, that's fairly obvious from how it's diagnosed in other parts of the world. But because the amount of times the person had used it for social clout or getting away with bad behaviour has vastly outnumbered the times where someone has genuinely seemed to struggle with communication.

[–] BogHag 7 points (+7|-0) Edited

I think a lot of mental illnesses/disorders get this treatment. Rather than looking at the culture, the environment, the lifestyle habits, or underlying trauma, it's easier to diagnose something and be done with it. Throw meds and a label on someone and you don't have to address any underlying issues. Also, sometimes people are just a little odd and we don't have to fucking medicalize every minor abnormality in behavior and personality.

I say this as someone who was pretty intensely mentally ill growing up. I would have been a lot better served if someone bothered to ask -why- I was having panic attacks and cutting and crying randomly. Instead, I got a series of diagnoses and prescriptions doled out like candy. I identified as "a person with major depressive disorder" and a series of anxiety disorders. I saw a therapist to talk, but I was my mental illness so there was no changing my mental patterns, only coping with them. I had a disease, so my constant vitriolic self-talk was a symptom, out of my control, rather than something I was responsible for and could work to actively change.

Psychiatry can be as toxic as it can helpful.

Thiiiiiiis. Some of the “diagnostic criteria” I see for spectrum disorders just seems to be, “is this child unusual in any way? Have unusual interests for a kid? Are they quiet and shy and tend to be afraid of other people? Yep, this kid’s on the spectrum.”

Had I been born later I feel very strongly I would’ve been diagnosed as autistic. Except I had a fucked up childhoos in which my parents had almost NO social interaction with people around us, so I couldn’t really develop social skills.

[–] Whateverbabe2 3 points (+3|-0)

Some people are high functioning autists though and don't have those struggles. I have Aspergers syndrome and MOST of my struggles are social. I don't pick up on sarcasm, catch jokes, and I take metaphors/hyperboles literally.

Yes, I do have sensory struggles (mostly auditory processing disorder) and it makes it hard for me to speak with a speech impediment that I've had all my life and listen to others because I cannot hear them, but the most painful part of autism for me is the social part. I feel incredibly isolated. My friendships are few and far between and always temporary. I am lonely. I am alone. I don't understand others, connect or relate to them. As someone with low social intelligence it makes me ANNOYING to others.

It annoys me as well when people call it a little personality quirk but you can't always tell someone is autistic. Sometimes they just seem "off". Few people believe me or take me seriously when I say I am autistic (one reason why I don't talk about it) but everyone thinks I'm weird, they pick up on it even though they don't know what it is. I'm sorry about your son but autism IS a spectrum and for some people like myself struggle most with the social challenges of autism.

[–] WombatRose 1 points (+1|-0)

I’m really sorry if my comment came across as dismissive of people with Aspergers. I should have clarified I was referring to the people the previous poster mentioned, those faking a diagnosis for social media clout, and not people who actually struggle with high functioning autism who of course have very real and debilitating struggles. Thank you for your comment, it is very important to point out that autism is a spectrum and no two people have the exact same symptoms or experience.

[–] winterghost 3 points (+3|-0)

one of my good friends is a nurse that works in a care home for elderly/adult disabled patients whose parents can't take care of them anymore and she is always mad about how these people treat autism.

[–] carpetplaydohx2 20 points (+20|-0)

As someone who has disabilities (physical, though, not mental, emotional, or behavioral), I can tell you that they're a part of me, but I have no desire for them to limit or define me. They are not me. They are just another aspect of my life, and while they can be limiting, they are not defining.

I see a lot of these people floundering in search of not just community but identity. They don't know who they are or where they belong, so they just make stuff up to try to shoehorn themselves in wherever they can find a spot. And if they have to force it through a faked diagnosis, so be it. They don't care if they're stomping all over people with real diagnoses. They only care that they finally feel like they belong.

[–] BlackCirce 🔮🐖🐖🐖 15 points (+15|-0)

I don’t know why they’re so focused on it but they’ve increased the stigma of having a disabling mental illness even more than I thought possible.

[–] GA626 14 points (+14|-0)

Having a disorder is the new “personality” trait among these people I’ve found. They absolutely cannot go existing normally without the world knowing how special they are and validating them because they have a disorder. I have a friend like this and another acquaintance that calls herself by every pRoNOUN. It’s annoying but even more so when people like this push their ideologies into already existing media. People like “identifying” as fictional characters as a form of escapism and some that do this know it’s not real, it’s a way of coping for them and strongly relating to a character. Others take it to the next level And literally believe they are that character because they had a dream of it. I have disorders myself but I don’t make them the only thing about me on social media and these people are just tiring to deal with.

[–] radically_done 14 points (+18|-4)

It's gotten to the point where if anyone claims to have any of the disorders listed online I automatically don't believe them.

Doubly so for DID which last I looked wasn't even acknowledged by psychiatrists as being a real disorder.

[–] KissMyOvaries 11 points (+11|-0)

DID is in the DSM so it is indeed acknowledged by the governing psychiatric organization in the USA.

[–] jewnicorn 12 points (+12|-0)

“Recently it's become popular for young people to fake disassociative identity disorder, Tourette's syndrome, ADHD, and even autism online.”

Tumblr user between 2010 and 2015. This isn’t recent or new, trust me.

[–] salt_and_tea 11 points (+11|-0)

It's a bit of a chicken and egg situation because a lot of internet munchies were doing their munching before they were genderspecials. Then the genderspecials came along and saw the attention you could get for munching and the munchies saw the attention you could get for genderwoo and the crossovers began. Now it's hard to remember who was what first - but I feel pretty confident what they're all actually suffering from is most likely a range of cluster b disorders. They're certainly causing me to suffer from copious amounts of second hand embarrassment.

[–] crodish 6 points (+6|-0)

Same reason they identified as non-binary to begin with. They just want attention and they believe they are soooo speshul because being average and functional is lame

[–] gncautistic 6 points (+6|-0)

R/fakedisordercringe is where you see it. There's a huge overall between QT's and fake disorders. Granted, a lot of neurodivergent people do get very easily sucked into these queer/trans/nonbinary type BS because it offers you a community, a place where you might finally feel like you fit in. I'm not sure how many of these people are actually ND, but probably a good handful of them who have some underlying disorder.

Load more (28 comments)