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They invest so much in their transition, and make highly detailed videos about what they've experienced. But try debating with any of them and it quickly becomes apparent to me that they have a very superficial understanding of what they are doing. They can basically only recite the bullet points on the informed consent forms but they don't know what any of it means. Common things I've seen:

  1. Poor understanding of research. "We don't have any research to say that it DOES harm you!" First of all, we do, but even if we didn't, that's not evidence that wrecking your hormones is a safe thing to do. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  2. A belief that unethical doctors are extremely rare, and CERTAINLY never found in the transgender healthcare field! Even if they do acknowledge bad ethics en masse, they view it as historical atrocity. Or, they act like the opioid crisis and transition treatments don't come from the same field.

  3. Very vague knowledge of what hormones do. They know how hormones can change appearance but don't know what else they do for the body.

  4. Baaaaarely wikipedia level of understanding of DSDs.

  5. They think individual features all come together so that they will pass. "Some men are short." "Some men have big butts." "Some men don't grow much facial hair." They don't realize that individual features don't overrule the entire presentation. Humans can easily tell the difference between a short man and a tall woman. And there's a recitation vibe to it- like they are repeating what doctors have told them. It feels like these doctors are trying to convince TIFs that if they retain very female features, they will still pass.

  6. Early hysterectomies and the link to dementia is always news to them. "I have NEVER heard that." That's their dismissal, too, to imply that you're a nut with weird beliefs.

Maybe detransitioners can weigh in, here. But I just don't think doctors do a thorough job, helping their patients fully understand their new medications. Isaac, a detrans TIM, recorded his therapist being glib and shady. I know that's just his therapist and not his doctor. But combined with the way TIFs discuss this online, it seems like doctors in the gender business don't fully inform. As a habit. Dr. Gallagher feigns transparency by talking about her surgical techniques- "wee little chonkies-" but does she talk about dementia?

They invest so much in their transition, and make highly detailed videos about what they've experienced. But try debating with any of them and it quickly becomes apparent to me that they have a very superficial understanding of what they are doing. They can basically only recite the bullet points on the informed consent forms but they don't know what any of it means. Common things I've seen: 1. Poor understanding of research. "We don't have any research to say that it DOES harm you!" First of all, we do, but even if we didn't, that's not evidence that wrecking your hormones is a safe thing to do. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. 2. A belief that unethical doctors are extremely rare, and CERTAINLY never found in the transgender healthcare field! Even if they do acknowledge bad ethics en masse, they view it as historical atrocity. Or, they act like the opioid crisis and transition treatments don't come from the same field. 3. Very vague knowledge of what hormones do. They know how hormones can change appearance but don't know what else they do for the body. 4. Baaaaarely wikipedia level of understanding of DSDs. 5. They think individual features all come together so that they will pass. "Some men are short." "Some men have big butts." "Some men don't grow much facial hair." They don't realize that individual features don't overrule the entire presentation. Humans can easily tell the difference between a short man and a tall woman. And there's a recitation vibe to it- like they are repeating what doctors have told them. It feels like these doctors are trying to convince TIFs that if they retain very female features, they will still pass. 6. Early hysterectomies and the link to dementia is always news to them. "I have NEVER heard that." That's their dismissal, too, to imply that you're a nut with weird beliefs. Maybe detransitioners can weigh in, here. But I just don't think doctors do a thorough job, helping their patients fully understand their new medications. Isaac, a detrans TIM, recorded his therapist being glib and shady. I know that's just his therapist and not his doctor. But combined with the way TIFs discuss this online, it seems like doctors in the gender business don't fully inform. As a habit. Dr. Gallagher feigns transparency by talking about her surgical techniques- "wee little chonkies-" but does she talk about dementia?

42 comments

I have a female friend who was sent into chemically-induced early menopause after her damaged ovaries completely failed when she was given Lupron for endometriosis in her 30s. She is in her 60s now and had been on life-long HRT after this happened and didn't want to cease it because every time she did (even at the time women would usually go through menopause) it was hellish. She ended up with breast cancer (luckily unaggressive and caught at a very early stage) and had to stop the HRT cold turkey as her doctors feared it would increase the chance of reoccurence and so she went through cancer treatment and a non-natural menopause at the same time... I told her they give Lupron to trans kids and she was shocked out of her mind, she had no fucking clue that's the kind of shit they gave them.

Yes exactly! And we’re grown adults with larger mature bodies. I never had Lupron but I had another treatment called danazol, and although it did suppress my symptoms I also lost breast tissue, my voice lowered, and I now grow a beard, my liver was damaged, my bone density was affected. Luckily my ovaries didn’t lose function even though the dr left me on it for 5x the recommended length.

I went through menopause when they started me on it, that’s no fun at all. These drugs should be left to do what they were meant to: suppress cancer in life or death situations.