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I’m looking for examples for something I’m writing. Trans people are diagnosed as trans based on not much more than their say-so. There are no lab tests, MRIs, CT or X-rays to diagnose it. I don’t think there’s any other medical field in which they cut off your testicles, uterus or any other organ because of the patient’s decision alone.

You can rule out cosmetic surgeries as an example, because trans surgeries aren’t just cosmetics - a double mastectomy isn’t just a breast reduction, for example.

My understanding is that psychiatric surgeries have gone mostly out of style, and while might be performed in some countries still, they’re a very rare edge case.

Thanks.

I’m looking for examples for something I’m writing. Trans people are diagnosed as trans based on not much more than their say-so. There are no lab tests, MRIs, CT or X-rays to diagnose it. I don’t think there’s any other medical field in which they cut off your testicles, uterus or any other organ because of the patient’s decision alone. You can rule out cosmetic surgeries as an example, because trans surgeries aren’t just cosmetics - a double mastectomy isn’t just a breast reduction, for example. My understanding is that psychiatric surgeries have gone mostly out of style, and while might be performed in some countries still, they’re a very rare edge case. Thanks.

41 comments

Sometimes they insert feeding ports for anorexia. Edit : typically not self diagnosed but is similar to trans imo.

I had to beg to have surgery in order to obtain a biopsy to prove my cramps were more than cramps, I was gaslit for 15 years that it was all in my head. Naw, it was stage 4 endometriosis by the time they took a look and biopsies were taken. Still not the same thing though.

[–] VestalVirgin 6 points Edited

But anorexia is actually treated medically, by feeding. If they treated it like trans, they'd treat it by giving the patient pills to help her lose even more weight.

Really, the only thing I can come up with that is treated with surgery on the patients' say-so is depression (I mean, sure, there's a diagnosis, but I'm not sure they can diagnose with brain-scan? Might be possible, though), and surgery is the very last resort there, AND they are operating the brain, the organ that causes the problem.

The problem with trans is that it's people having brain problems, and this is then "treated" by operating on their perfectly healthy bodies.

[–] ProxyMusic 0 points Edited

anorexia is actually treated medically, by feeding

No, malnutrition, extreme emaciation, electrolyte imbalance, etc resulting from advanced anorexia that put physical health and life at risk are treated by feeding - and this is usually done as a last resort in the most severe cases. Such interventions are always done on people who are undergoing, or have undergone, various forms treatment for their anorexia itself. Any clinician who advises that feeding is a way to treat anorexia itself is a crackpot. Anorexia is a mental health problem that can lead to physical problems. Feeding is a way of ameliorating some of the physical health problems secondary to anorexia, but it is not a way of treating the primary problem of anorexia itself.

Really, the only thing I can come up with that is treated with surgery on the patients' say-so is depression

Brain stimulation and one kind of surgery are occasionally done for treatment-resistant depression nowadays, but only as a last resort in a handful of extreme cases after a host of anti-depressant medications, medication combinations, psychotherapy and other interventions such as a series of IV ketamine and ECT have been tried and failed - and often only after a patient has spent time under observation and treatment as an in-patient in a psych hospital or ward. Surgery for depression is not a first-line option for garden-variety depression or even disabling MDD - and it's certainly not offered or given to people who've had one or or a couple of office consults, either. Plus, a diagnosis TRMDD and surgical intervention for it are never given on a "patients' say-so." Before recommending extreme measures like ECT or deep brain stimulation, psychiatrists will have patients undergo a variety of physical diagnostic tests to rule out underlying physical causes for their depression - brain injury or disease, infection, inflammation, for example. Moreover, extreme measures like ECT and brain surgery are usually only recommended for those who have spent time as in-patients in psych wards or hospitals and whose moods, affect, behaviors, sleep patterns, appetite, weight, self-descriptions and complaints have been closely observed and documented during that time.

https://www.verywellmind.com/bilateral-cingulotomy-380662

[–] Sylvanas [OP] 2 points Edited

I’m not a doctor, but I’m guessing that feeding ports would be based on blood tests that show malnourishment. It’s likely that there would be more evidence than a girl’s subjective testimony that she hates eating.

[–] ProxyMusic 0 points Edited

A feeding port isn't a treatment for anorexia, though; a feeding port is employed as a last resort to counteract one of the dangerous results of anorexia that's advanced - malnutrition that puts a patient's physical health and very life at risk. Putting in a feeding port is an emergency measure to save a anorectic's physical health and life, but in no way does a feeding port and tube treat the underlying problem of anorexia, a problem that is psychiatric. On the contrary, this type of intervention will most likely make the mental health aspects of anorexia worse and cause affected patients to be more resistant to treatments for the underlying, core illness of anorexia.

Portraying a feeding port as a treatment for anorexia is akin to saying that stitching up and bandaging someone's slit wrists,. or pumping their stomachs, after suicide attempts are treatments for major depressive disorder with suicidal ideation/urges. Apples and oranges.

Similarly, a biopsy is an investigational intervention done for the purpose of diagnosing or ruling out disease or a health condition. A biopsy is not a treatment. Though if biopsy ultimately results in a finding of disease or a health condition, biopsies can and often do lead to treatments being recommended and employed.

I am sorry you got the sort of medical run-around that so many girls and women get for our longstanding, very real health problems. I hope you've been able to obtain treatment for your endometriosis that has led to some relief.