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16 comments

Argh it's infuriating.

No, TIMs aren't being "banned" from playing - they just can't play against women.

And no, Ireland-specific research does not need to be done - Irish people are not fundamentally biologically different from other human beings in terms of sexual dimorphism.

And no, the trans community should not be central to making these decision because they've proven time and time again that they will either ignore or flat out lie about the actual data on differences in male vs female athletic performance and the impact of taking cross-sex hormones on male performance.

At least this article specifically says banned from female contact rugby. What I don’t like is the part that says the IRFU is talking to them about other options including non contact, when they’ve already established that men have an unfair advantage that doesn’t go away just by declaring they have lady brains. What they should do is say that they can compete against men if they want to play.

And yeah the bit about how they shouldn’t follow Englands lead is nonsense, because this first came from World Rugby not the RFU.

This IS great news!

However, it's strange that the article reports that this decision "directly impacts" only two registered rugby players...obviously the two female-identifying males now banned from playing on the women's teams: this decision also directly impacts the female players who 1) are now at ZERO risk of greater injury from male-on-female collisions in their sport; and, 2) are at much less risk of self-exclusion from playing due to concerns of safety or discomfort from having to share locker rooms and showers with male teammates.

Also strange that the journalist only thought to reach out to pro-trans / LBGTQ+ groups for reaction to the decision...which, predictably, was ZERO appreciation for the fact that women, adult human females playing in women's rugby teams in Ireland, will now be much safer...and, gnashing of teeth, of course, over the "lack of inclusion" that male athletes who subjectively...delusionally feel that they're women...inside...would experience.

Is there a "Fair Play for Women" Chapter in Ireland? And, if so, what was its response to this magnificent decision grounded in material reality and concern for...women...the demographic for whom the WOMEN'S rugby league was established in the first place?

Yes, this affects women in rugby positively and only “negatively” affects 2 men. It will be a while before a mainstream news media outlet frames it like that though.

I don’t think there is an Irish Fair Play For Women, but technically this affects women in Northern Ireland too since Ulster is part of the IRFU. And internationally they play for Ireland.

It's telling that the only people who are considered impacted are the men negatively impacted, but not the women positively impacted. It's almost like the only people whose feelings matter are the penised ones.

[–] SuddenlyRamen 21 points Edited

It's a weird time when common sense is breaking news headline worthy. Weird times we live in indeed.

It's a weird time when common sense is breaking news headline worthy.

And it' s considered evil nazism by a good chunk of the "good guyx".

It must be quite scary for the transwomen to suddenly start playing with men. The men are probably much bigger, heavier and play rougher than the women…. Eh….wait a minute….

[–] Lipsy 8 points Edited

The club said the move “further reduces spaces for transgender people to exist safely,”

Their rugby options have just been "reduced" to... the same standards that apply to everybody else.

"This means contact rugby for players in the female category will be limited to those whose sex was recorded as female at birth."

Ugh. I'm so tired of this stupid semantics game.

The sex which is recorded at your birth is the sex you are right now. That will never change. Not with a piece of paper, not with anything. It simply will never change.

These stupid news articles are basically writing pieces to tell us that, iN ShOCkiNg NeWs, men are being banned from female sports.

Boo hoo.

At least it's better than saying "assigned at birth". And saying "recorded female at birth" technically doesn't guarantee a belief that sex can change.

I suspect this writer gave some real consideration about how to word this accurately without outraging the woke mob.

[–] ProxyMusic 0 points Edited

Yeah, but "recorded female at birth" leaves a huge loophole for the many people whose sex was not recorded at birth - or in childhood - because they grew up without ever seeing a health care provider or having their births recorded and registered. There are lots of people in the world today who for whom there are no medical records or other records like birth certificates dating from infancy and childhood showing what their sex was thought to be at birth and growing up.

A ton of XY DSD athletes like Caster Semenya, Francine Niyonsaba, Christine Mboma, Barbra Banda, Dutee Chand and many more have taken advantage of the fact that they never got birth certificates or saw doctors when they were growing up to horn in on girls' and women's sports starting when they were in their late teens.

[–] ProxyMusic 0 points Edited

But the problems with the phrase "sex recorded as female at birth" are even worse than you say. Using "sex recorded at birth" as the criterion for inclusion in women's sports creates a host of other practical problems because

  • the phrasing doesn't specify exactly what kinds of record/s it means and considers valid for determining sports eligibility for women's rugby in Ireland: medical records? the records of government birth registries that issue birth certificates? the records of local parishes that issue baptismal certificates? family/village records? the diaries, blogs or social media accounts of mothers/parents?

  • the phrasing ignores that many people in the world do not have any medical records, birth certificates or baptismal records showing what their sex was "at birth." In fact, they don't have any records stating their "sex at birth" dating to anywhere near the time of their birth, or from their childhoods at all. Lots of births occur outside of medical settings, and in many poor countries even today it is very common for children to grow up without their parents registering their births and obtaining birth certificates for them. None of the many XY DSD athletes playing in women's sports obtained birth certificates or saw health care providers when they were babies, children or young adolescents. For example, Caster Semenya didn't get a birth certificate until Semenya was 16 - and Semenya's BC stating that Semenya's sex is "female" was issued by the same government whose corrupt officials were already invested in trying pass off Semenya as a girl/woman on the world stage in hopes that this would bring South Africa some easy international sports gold and glory.

  • the phrasing ignores that even in cases of persons whose parents did obtain birth certificates for them in a timely fashion, births are rarely registered with government authorities "at birth." When births are registered with official government record-keeping bodies, this is customarily done in the days, weeks or months after birth. But again, that's only the case in places where obtaining birth certificates for babies is the norm. In many countries in sub-Saharan Africa even today, large segments of the population do not obtain birth certificates for their children when they they are babies. In Namibia, for example, half of all children will begin first grade with their births still unregistered. This is why Namibia has passed a law allowing birth registrations and birth certificate applications to be filed on behalf of children by adults who are not their parents, such as school administrators and traveling nurses who visit schools.

  • the phrasing ignores that due to commonplace phenomena like immigration and migration; working and living abroad; foreign study; asylum programs; youth exchange programs, etc. some people playing rugby in Ireland inevitably will have been born and spent childhood in other countries. Some might not have or be able to provide any records stating their sex dating to the time of their births, or from their childhoods or adolescence at all. Others might come from places where it's easy to change sex markers on birth certificates and other records and official documents by using gender identity claims - or paying bribes to corrupt government officials.

They can never simply say "men banned from women's competitions". Always has to be "trans women", like there is literally any difference between that and a man.