5

I've noticed a few news stories about this documentary, it sounds like it might be interesting. I hope the program gives Laws the attention of Congress that this issue deserves.

However, it was not just revenge porn that was fueling Moore's website. Moore had sourced many of his images via hacking—a criminal offence—employing hacker Charles Evens to break into people's email addresses, stealing their most intimate images.

Moore did not stop there. On IsAnyoneUp.com, he would also post links to victims' social media accounts and their personal details such as their place of work and city of residence, making them easily identifiable and potentially, at risk. There was also a comment section, where hateful commentary was rampant.

Charlotte Laws' daughter, Kayla Laws, was a victim of Moore's hacking in 2010. Her email was hacked by Evens and days later, her personal and private images were plastered all over IsAnyoneUp.com, alongside links to her social media accounts. [...]

Charlotte Laws spoke to nine attorneys for help who "threw up their hands," explaining that it was not illegal to share nude pictures of people. They were also turned away at a local police station. [...] However, other women were not so lucky. In The Most Hated Man on the Internet, viewers hear from numerous female victims who speak bravely of their worlds being turned upside down when their images appeared on IsAnyoneUp.com without their consent. [...]

To begin with, Charlotte Laws spoke with 40 women whose images were posted in the two weeks around Kayla's images appearing on the site, finding 40 percent of them had been hacked. She did everything to raise awareness, reaching out to journalists, publishing blog posts, and eventually, catching the attention of the FBI, handing over her research to the Los Angeles Internet Crime Division in 2012. Laws became much more than a private investigator working to stop Moore. She became a "hotline" for Moore's victims, and has been one for revenge-porn victims ever since. [...]

Thankfully, the international activist group Anonymous vowed to protect Charlotte Laws and her family. They doxed Moore's personal information, including his date of birth, home address, phone number, social media handles, parents' names, IP addresses, OK Cupid profile, and a list of pending lawsuits against him. They also restricted Moore's bank accounts, had him declared dead, and sent a box of sex toys to his home address.

In January 2014, Moore was arrested by the FBI on charges of conspiracy, unauthorized access to a protected computer, and aggravated identity theft. Moore was released on a $100,000 bond and pleaded guilty to felony charges for aggravated identity theft and aiding and abetting in the unauthorized access of a computer in February 2015. He was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for his crimes and received a $2,000 fine in November 2015. He was also required to pay $145 in victim restitution.

Evens, who hacked the accounts for Moore, pleaded guilty to charges of computer hacking and identity theft, confessing to stealing hundreds of images from women's email accounts and selling them to Moore. He was sentenced to two years in prison.

She has continued to meet with state and federal legislators in a bid to create laws to protect future victims of revenge porn. In 2013, she gave testimony before the California State Senate in favor of a law to support victims of nonconsensual pornography. The law was passed in October 2013, making California the second state to make certain types of revenge porn illegal after New Jersey. Since then, she has campaigned to make revenge porn in 48 states illegal and is continuing to campaign to make it a federal crime. Charlotte Laws is hoping The Most Hated Man on the Internet will help "push Congress" into making revenge porn a federal crime in the U.S., but one thing is for sure, people will not be forgetting the incredible work she has done.

https://www.newsweek.com/charlotte-laws-hunter-moore-most-hated-man-internet-netflix-1729037

I've noticed a few news stories about this documentary, it sounds like it might be interesting. I hope the program gives Laws the attention of Congress that this issue deserves. >However, it was not just revenge porn that was fueling Moore's website. Moore had sourced many of his images via hacking—a criminal offence—employing hacker Charles Evens to break into people's email addresses, stealing their most intimate images. >Moore did not stop there. **On IsAnyoneUp.com, he would also post links to victims' social media accounts and their personal details such as their place of work and city of residence, making them easily identifiable and potentially, at risk.** There was also a comment section, where hateful commentary was rampant. >Charlotte Laws' daughter, Kayla Laws, was a victim of Moore's hacking in 2010. Her email was hacked by Evens and days later, her personal and private images were plastered all over IsAnyoneUp.com, alongside links to her social media accounts. [...] >**Charlotte Laws spoke to nine attorneys for help who "threw up their hands," explaining that it was not illegal to share nude pictures of people.** They were also turned away at a local police station. [...] However, other women were not so lucky. In The Most Hated Man on the Internet, viewers hear from numerous female victims who speak bravely of their worlds being turned upside down when their images appeared on IsAnyoneUp.com without their consent. [...] >To begin with, Charlotte **Laws spoke with 40 women whose images were posted in the two weeks around Kayla's images appearing on the site, finding 40 percent of them had been hacked. She did everything to raise awareness, reaching out to journalists, publishing blog posts, and eventually, catching the attention of the FBI, handing over her research to the Los Angeles Internet Crime Division in 2012. Laws became much more than a private investigator working to stop Moore. She became a "hotline" for Moore's victims, and has been one for revenge-porn victims ever since.** [...] >Thankfully, the international activist group Anonymous vowed to protect Charlotte Laws and her family. They doxed Moore's personal information, including his date of birth, home address, phone number, social media handles, parents' names, IP addresses, OK Cupid profile, and a list of pending lawsuits against him. They also restricted Moore's bank accounts, had him declared dead, and sent a box of sex toys to his home address. >In January 2014, Moore was arrested by the FBI on charges of conspiracy, unauthorized access to a protected computer, and aggravated identity theft. Moore was released on a $100,000 bond and pleaded guilty to felony charges for aggravated identity theft and aiding and abetting in the unauthorized access of a computer in February 2015. He was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for his crimes and received a $2,000 fine in November 2015. He was also required to pay $145 in victim restitution. >Evens, who hacked the accounts for Moore, pleaded guilty to charges of computer hacking and identity theft, confessing to stealing hundreds of images from women's email accounts and selling them to Moore. He was sentenced to two years in prison. >She has continued to meet with state and federal legislators in a bid to create laws to protect future victims of revenge porn. In 2013, she gave testimony before the California State Senate in favor of a law to support victims of nonconsensual pornography. The law was passed in October 2013, making California the second state to make certain types of revenge porn illegal after New Jersey. Since then, she has campaigned to make revenge porn in 48 states illegal and is continuing to campaign to make it a federal crime. Charlotte Laws is hoping The Most Hated Man on the Internet will help "push Congress" into making revenge porn a federal crime in the U.S., but one thing is for sure, people will not be forgetting the incredible work she has done. https://www.newsweek.com/charlotte-laws-hunter-moore-most-hated-man-internet-netflix-1729037

4 comments

Charlotte Laws spoke to nine attorneys for help who "threw up their hands," explaining that it was not illegal to share nude pictures of people. They were also turned away at a local police station.

This is why I can't get mad at victims of harassment/abuse who resort to unconventional means to defend themselves. The legal system simply doesn't prioritize their safety and well-being. And even if it did, so many police officers, lawyers, and judges just aren't motivated to help women who've been victimized.

It’s very difficult to believe that there are no laws that could cover this.