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Giving some GC love to the movie Babe (1995) and the children's book it was based off, The Sheep-Pig (1983).

See, Babe is a pig who gets adopted by a sheepdog and wants to do what sheepdogs do. But Babe is not a dog. When Babe tries to herd sheep the way that a dog does, he fails, because he's small and doesn't have sharp teeth to frighten the sheep into listening to him. The other farm animals tell Babe to give up because he is a pig, and pigs aren't meant to herd sheep.

But Babe still wants to herd sheep, so he discovers his own way of herding by asking the sheep politely. And the sheep listen to Babe because he is small and polite and doesn't have sharp teeth.

You see, Babe is a pig who wants to be a sheepdog and do the things that a sheepdog does, but no one ever calls him a dog. Because Babe is obviously not a dog. Babe is a pig, and therefore, when he's successful at sheep-herding, he becomes a sheep-pig.

Babe doesn't feel any lesser by being a sheep-pig instead of a sheep-dog. Babe is still constrained by his biological reality of being a pig. During the movie, he learns and has to live with the knowledge that he--and his lost mother and siblings--were bought and sold to be eaten. If Babe pretended he was dog, that reality would not change. In fact, if Babe had doubled down on trying to herd sheep like a dog, he would have failed and eventually been eaten, because Babe doesn't have the biological traits that a dog does.

A similar story arc happens with Ferdinand the Duck. Ferdinand knows he is a duck, but wants to be a rooster who crows and wakes the farmer up, so that the farmer will find him useful and not eat him. But Ferdinand is not a rooster, and his fake crowing only annoys the farmer and his wife. After a fellow duck is killed for Christmas dinner, Ferdinand realizes he can never be a rooster and leaves the farm instead.

Moral of the Story: you can't change what you biologically are, but you can change the role that society prescribes to you by embracing your natural traits in unique ways.

Giving some GC love to the movie Babe (1995) and the children's book it was based off, The Sheep-Pig (1983). See, Babe is a pig who gets adopted by a sheepdog and wants to do what sheepdogs do. But Babe is not a dog. When Babe tries to herd sheep the way that a dog does, he fails, because he's small and doesn't have sharp teeth to frighten the sheep into listening to him. The other farm animals tell Babe to give up because he is a pig, and pigs aren't meant to herd sheep. But Babe still wants to herd sheep, so he discovers his own way of herding by asking the sheep politely. And the sheep listen to Babe *because* he is small and polite and doesn't have sharp teeth. You see, Babe is a pig who wants to be a sheepdog and do the things that a sheepdog does, but no one ever calls him a dog. Because Babe is obviously not a dog. Babe is a pig, and therefore, when he's successful at sheep-herding, he becomes a sheep-pig. Babe doesn't feel any lesser by being a sheep-pig instead of a sheep-dog. Babe is still constrained by his biological reality of being a pig. During the movie, he learns and has to live with the knowledge that he--and his lost mother and siblings--were bought and sold to be eaten. If Babe pretended he was dog, that reality would not change. In fact, if Babe had doubled down on trying to herd sheep like a dog, he would have failed and eventually been eaten, because Babe doesn't have the biological traits that a dog does. A similar story arc happens with Ferdinand the Duck. Ferdinand knows he is a duck, but wants to be a rooster who crows and wakes the farmer up, so that the farmer will find him useful and not eat him. But Ferdinand is not a rooster, and his fake crowing only annoys the farmer and his wife. After a fellow duck is killed for Christmas dinner, Ferdinand realizes he can never be a rooster and leaves the farm instead. **Moral of the Story:** you can't change what you biologically are, but you *can* change the role that society prescribes to you by embracing your natural traits in unique ways.

17 comments

Herman Hesse said it best in his book "Demian" : "If nature has made you a bat, you shouldn't try and be an ostrich."

I do have fond memories of that movie because not only it was the first one I watched that, behind the scenes, really went in-depth about the technology used to make the animals talk and move their mouths in a realistic manner. Talk about uncanny: if nature made you a dog (or a sheep or a pig), don't try to be a human and move your mouth in the same way they do when they talk. Just keep "talking" in your own way according to your species and the people who understand will hear you loud and clear :)

Moral of the Story: you can't change what you biologically are, but you can change the role that society prescribes to you by embracing your natural traits in unique ways.

This is beautiful. I’d never thought of the movie Babe as having the possibility to hint at gender critical themes, but it’s really great point - there’s a huge difference between a man wanting to paint his nails and grow his hair long (or whatever else), vs. a man who claims he actually IS a woman because of the stereotypically feminine things he’s doing.

🤣 great analysis

And, I ADORE that movie 💜 only the first one though. In my opinion they never should’ve made the other ones and just left a masterpiece a masterpiece 🐷

I honestly prefer Pig in the City just because it's completely wild; not saying Babe isn't good, I just prefer the Miller directed rather than produced film. It's like a mix of Amelie, Lynch with George Miller's love for fish eye lens and uncomfortable close ups. Nobody acts like a human being except for Mrs Hoggett and it's made La Vie en Rose incredibly haunting whenever I hear it.

“That’ll do pig , that’ll do “- loved that film growing up!!
I think it’s a nice analogy to use and may even help children understand biological reality and the important lesson that people can do what they like and it won’t make them any less of a woman or man

Interesting! I never heard about this movie before but I will check it out thanks for the rec! :)

What you said about what would happen to Babe if he tried doing a dog's job reminded me of what I heard a detrans male saying about that TIM that wants a womb implant to get pregnant and give birth...

The detrans male said that nature did not give a male body the ability to give birth because that's something that only a real biological female can do and that if the TIM goes on with his intend get a womb implant he will not give birth, he will just die trying because nature did not make the male body for giving birth...

Aww love that movie. I sing the lullaby to my kids. So sweet

Loved the movies, and loved this moral! Thank you! (BTW, oddly, Babe 2 is one of the worst movies ever made. How can Babe 1 be so wonderful, and Babe 2 be so awful???)

Aww, I loved that movie when I was a kid. Did the talking mice scare anybody else or was that just me? lol