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What did you all think? First 1/2 had me hard. That scene to the tunnel— every woman knows that feeling. The last bit was… a bit much; a little too folded in on itself, perhaps. Would love to hear your theories/interpretations!

What did you all think? First 1/2 had me hard. That scene to the tunnel— every woman knows that feeling. The last bit was… a bit much; a little too folded in on itself, perhaps. Would love to hear your theories/interpretations!

4 comments

At least even the movie admits that the last bit was too much. She straight up gets bored after the third or fourth birth and goes to sit down inside the house.

The criticisms of this movie were interesting to see. Everyone was comparing it to Last Night on Soho, saying the movie only says 'man bad' and has nothing more to say, but it's a lot more than that. I personally interpret as a movie about the pervasiveness of perceived guilt (and the blame being placed on women), the difficulty of self-doubt (and gaslighting) and the inherent danger of going anywhere alone as a woman.

the inherent danger of going anywhere alone as a woman.

In the beginning I 100% thought this was going to be a film about the owner of the Air BnB stalking her.

[–] Zamiel 6 points Edited

Yes, it got kinda goofy and on the nose there. But I like the point it made about how sexism/patriarchy/toxic masculinity has all these different incarnations (as seen in the Green Man, priest, white knight, boy, policeman, ...) who display varying degrees of misogyny, but that these are really all the same thing at heart, and all perpetuated by men themselves.

The way that, towards the end, the men were like in agony in their self-sustaining cycle of misery, pleadingly reaching out to Harper... it reminded me of the various ways men create their own problems and then go crying to women (often feminists in particular) to solve them, care for them, mother them. Or in Geoffrey's case the issue is that he was bullied by his father for not living up to some standard of masculinity which is sad and all, but it still made him not treat women as equals. Like I quite appreciated that it lumped that kind of more benign sexism in with the more egregious forms lol. Also I really like Jessie Buckley and Rory Kinnear, very glad to see them in this.

I think I was with it all the way for the first 2/3s. I absolutely thought it was wonderful. Every woman knows those things as you've said - the particular gut-punch for me is when the female cop downplays the severity of the naked man in the garden, and even tries to get Harper to feel sorry for him. There was a theme in the film that men use their mental illness as a cover for abuse (which I don't think is talked about enough) and that police and wider society use this to tell victims that their fear of the abuser is unkind.

I absolutely loved the bit where her friend's face freezes on the phone screen in a scream. It was such a wonderful way of bringing classic horror techniques to the modern day. That was the moment at which I thought "This is going to be a great film."

The moment at which I thought "This is not going to be such a great film," was when the young boy turned up. Initially I loved that he was covered by a Marilyn Monroe mask, just for the visual pop of colour and the shock value. But when he took the mask off, I just hated the de-ageing technology used on Kinnear. It was just too crap to be worth it, it cheapened the whole film to me. I don't know how the hundreds of people the film had to get past to reach the big screen can all have seen that and thought "Yep, that's good to go."

I thought Kinnear's abilities with the different characters were great. I loved Geoffrey, but I thought he stood out as more of a sit-com character in what was initially presented as a psychological drama. Great character, great performance, but maybe a bit too comedic for the film. I did love the bit where he's in the garden and the lights go out, but for me that was the last good bit in the film. I take the point about how patriarchy perpetuates patriarchy since ancient times, but I thought the spectacle wasn't frightening or interesting enough to make its point so drawn out.

When the preist says "You cry out to me not as Ulysses, but as Salem", what the fuck is he talking about? Why would Ulysses be crying out to this man at all, and what would that similie mean? I get that with Salem he's saying she's bewitching him, but wtf is Ulysses doing there? I thought it might be a joke about a certain type of pseudo-intellectual Nice Guy and the nonsense they say, but maybe there's something else I'm not seeing.

The bit where Harper's husband finally sits on the couch with her, and she says "What do you want from me?" and he says "Your love" - that confused me when I saw it. He doesn't particularly want her love, he wants to control her and have her undivided attention. Maybe the point is that while being abusive, he believes himself to have good intentions? It didn't quite work for me.

Does anyone have any theories on what it meant at the end when her friend turns out to be pregnant? That's significant in some way, right?

In the end, I think this seemed like two films stitched together: an intelligent, atmospheric gothic horror with a modern setting, and a supernatural slasher horror. I loved the first and didn't much care for the second. I think they could have been intertwined into one film better, but they weren't.