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Now we know that one of the most common critiques that Feminists have about the movie industry is how male dominated it is and how women are portrayed badly by all the male directors out there but with that said which ones do you think portray women in a relatively ok way?

I think as far as live action goes I would go with Quentin Tarantino if only because he gave us the awesome Kill Bill movies which I love due to all the reasons I stated here : https://ovarit.com/test/o/Movies/204676/anyone-here-watched-kill-bill

And as far as animation goes I would go with Hayao Miyazaki due to all the awesome heroines of the Studio Ghibli movies ( he prefers female protagonists in his movies apparently ) and he also gets a MAJOR thumbs up from me for calling out all the creepers in the anime community like when he called out the " lolicon " crowd! He hates people who sexualize the heroines of his movies! : https://www.reddit.com/r/GamerGhazi/comments/404hg7/comment/cyrofjv/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

Now we know that one of the most common critiques that Feminists have about the movie industry is how male dominated it is and how women are portrayed badly by all the male directors out there but with that said which ones do you think portray women in a relatively ok way? I think as far as live action goes I would go with [Quentin Tarantino](https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Creator/QuentinTarantino) if only because he gave us the awesome Kill Bill movies which I love due to all the reasons I stated here : https://ovarit.com/test/o/Movies/204676/anyone-here-watched-kill-bill And as far as animation goes I would go with [Hayao Miyazaki ](https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Creator/HayaoMiyazaki)due to all the awesome heroines of the Studio Ghibli movies ( he prefers female protagonists in his movies apparently ) and he also gets a MAJOR thumbs up from me for calling out all the creepers in the anime community like when he called out the " lolicon " crowd! He hates people who sexualize the heroines of his movies! : https://www.reddit.com/r/GamerGhazi/comments/404hg7/comment/cyrofjv/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

37 comments

I'm sorry but I have to highly disagree with Tarantino. The women are sexualized and the rape scene in that movie turned my stomach as well as the creepy foot fetish nonsense.

A really good director I think is Ari Aster. Midsommar and Hereditary were very cool to me.

[–] Femina [OP] -2 points Edited

Which scenes did you think sexualized the women? I can only think of the nurse Elle scene... As far as the rape scene goes I think it was offscreen wasn't it? She also kills the bloke by biting his tongue off if I remember correctly...

I also thought the foot scene was weird too but foot is far from being the worst fetish out there... I mean it is not an abuse fetish that can get anyone hurt like choking can it is just... Weird for lack of a better word...

Shocked at my own brain listing off male directors and realizing no, not them. I am struggling to come up with some.

The Ghibli protagonists are pretty cool. :')

So far I'd have to say Mike Flanagan? I loved the characters in Bly Manor. I guess technically they're not his own, but I like how the women are portrayed - and lesbian relationships - just as people. Nothing fetish-y.

Was also going to say Flanagan. His work, what I've seen so far, has been consistently good.

So a lot of his films have been flops, but honestly, I like the way Ben Falcone (Melissa McCarthy's husband) portrays female characters. Women in his movies don't exist to prop up men or be objectified, but they also aren't shoehorned into the "very badass not vulnerable strong woman™" stereotype. They can be flawed and still heroic, express sexuality in a non-male gaze way, and are always main characters in their own right.

Satoshi Kon wrote wonderfully interesting and complicated female characters. Millenium Actress, Perfect Blue, Paprika each have a main female character who has more depth and soul than 99% of other female anime characters combined.

Didn't Tarantino horribly abuse and almost kill Uma Thurman on the set of Kill Bill though?

She did a stunt she was insecure about and he encouraged her to do it. She had to drive a car very fast down a windy dirt road. She did it, crashed and got a head injury. She told him she wanted to release the footage of the accident and he agreed.

it's quite a bit more complicated than that. If anyone wants to read about it, her story on Tarantino and Weinstein is here.

Archive link.

This part about Harvey, yikes

Thurman says that she could tolerate the mogul in supervised environments and that she assumed she had “aged out of the window of his assault range.”

It is more complicated. He admitted he was too scared of Weinstein and did nothing when he should have.

I would choose George Cukor from back in the 1930’s to the early 50’s. He worked with Hollywood’s leading ladies, and was known to get great performances. He also liked strong, independent women. He directed one of my favorite films, “The Women.” The film had no men it, not even in the background and the performances of the women were terrific and hilarious. Check him out if you like old movies.

Mikio Naruse (A Woman Ascends the Stairs); Robert Altman (Nashville, Three Women, Thieves Like Us); Antonioni (Le Amiche, L'Avventura, La notte, L'eclisse).

But far above them all, the incomparable Kenzo Mizoguchi.

Saturday night live. All sorts of women. Old, young, fat, thin. Everyone doesn’t have to be hot.

I've been fairly happy with how James Cameron has portrayed women. But if you have rants about some of his films, I'm open to counterargument. I haven't seen all of them, and haven't seen any of them in a while.

I've noticed that male writers/directors tend to prefer particular types of women, rather than women in general, so I'm always a bit leery.

James Cameron does tend to do a good job with his women characters. Titanic, even though it's seen as a somewhat cheesy relic of 90's disaster movies, is a notable example. It is at its heart the story of a young woman earning her independence from those who wish to keep her trapped within the confines of patriarchal expectations and embracing life for all it has to offer on her own terms.

One of my absolute favorite films about women, Stage Door (1937), is directed by a man, Gregory La Cava. But I haven't seen his other movies yet, so can't say if he's consistently this good.

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