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Libfems exclusively listen to the voice of the privileged, and ignore those of the oppressed. Women who willingly run onlyfans and pornhub channel matter to them, but not the forced prostitutes and trafficking victims.

Just like how they value the opinions of biological males over those of women, and how they love to highlight the willing participants of misogynistic religions and shush the voices of brutalized women and girls.

Exactly! And even the ones who do it willingly can experience distress and trauma afterwards. I was a sugar baby in NYC in my early 20s, made a lot of money and was never physically abused. However, I still suffer the emotional consequences, having just turned 30, and if I could go back, I would never have made that choice (being from a financially stable, supportive middle class family, it was a choice for me)

Given that “sex worker” is a term coined by pimps to pretend that they are part of the same group as the women and children they abuse, anyone who cares about prostituted women should be excluding them ... except from prosecution.

I used to think "sex work is work" meant something like prostitution is hard like coal mining. I always thought it was a refrain against the sexism of the union movement that portrayed sex work as highly-paid lounging around.

Only recently I realised that some people say it to mean "sex work is a career and your daughter might do great at it".

I was thrown out of a "feminist" FB group recently for asking a question about sex work. It was, if sex work is work, will we promote it to our children as a career path? And should we require unemployed persons to take up sex work before we give them benefits?

And should we require unemployed persons to take up sex work before we give them benefits?

I don't remember where I read it, or know the veracity, but I've heard this is a legitimate problem in Germany, that unemployed women are told to try prostitution, since it's legal. Even if it's not true, the fact that it's presented as plausible is terrifying.

That is terrifying. I've never had to collect benefits or welfare so far in life, but it can happen to anyone and I cannot imagine being told to sell my body before I can qualify for benefits. I know you just said you don't know if it's true/really happened, but I can't help but wonder at the hypotheticals, like what happens to women who simply don't have sex/or never have? Women who are religiously celibate or just not interested in sex at all? Would trying prostitution just be a soft suggestion, or an actual requirement pf trying every avenue of work before the gov't has to pay out? Would men be suggested to sell their bodies also (obviously not)? What a horrifying thing to contemplate, and it just reinforces in me the conviction that "legal prostitution" should not be normalized.

Imagine pimps on high school campuses, recruiting girls who are about to turn 18. Participating in Career fairs! Lectures at Student Assembly! The mind reels.

Yeah, It’s almost as if there’s a judgement that any woman who speaks against personal experience was either just “not cut out for it” it has mental health issues in general...and...hello? most women who go into ‘sex work’ had an unstable childhood which produced mental health issues OR developed them while working in that world...the genuinely confident and happy are few and far between and I would bet my left foot they’re still operating on rationalization in which they tell themselves something like, “At least I made this much money; Well it’s not forever; Maybe I’ll be a star one day” rather than being truly, truly okay.