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38 comments

[–] Lipsy #bornnotworn 15 points Edited

LOL this is so adorable I laughed out loud.

FYI though, this choice is never ambiguous for actual speakers of Spanish.
Most speakers I've heard limn this as an abbreviated form of the expression "género no binario" (non-binary gender) where the omitted "género" is just understood—meaning that even if they 'slipped up' and said/wrote non-binary Woman, they'd still word it as "una mujer no binario" (NOT una mujer no binaria).
This invariant masculine form of the word is also reinforced by the fact that adjectives made from nouns—like "transgénero"—never ever genderflex, either. A transgender woman is "una mujer transgénero" in authentic Spanish regardless of dialect.
(These words aren't supposed to pluralize, either, so a careful educated writer would write, say, *unas mujeres transgénero"—which tends to 'look wrong' to adult learners, but, ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. Lots of actual Spanish speakers ignore that rule and go ahead and pluralize it, though—in the same way as lots of native English speakers never use the word "whom".)

"Transgénera" is a non-word of exactly the same type as "latinx": it's a hypercorrection of something that shouldn't even be 'corrected' in the first place unless you're an arrogant foreigner thoughtlessly overlaying your own language's principles over some hapless, long-suffering dialect of Spanish.
This makes for some fun googling, though, because any and all instances of "transgénera" you might find in discussions of gender ID will all be penned by language-colonialist idiots whose writing contains many other idiocies, too. 🤷🏽‍♀️ Far be it from me to pass up such a great opportunity to continually SMH my way through a whole wall of text.

I've seen exactly one person write it as "non-binary person" instead, which is una persona no binaria where the whole 9 yards is "feminine" words even for boytype persons. (Una persona all by itself is conclusive proof that "word gender" has NONE of the angsty significances that the "latinx" crowd thinks it does.)
Interestingly this is the one and only actual Spaniard, from Spain, whose words i've seen on this topic... so there may or may not be a difference of thingys here.

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[–] Disappearanceoftheychromosomer ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) 2 points

Lots of actual Spanish speakers ignore that rule No, we don't, because it would sound silly and unatural. In this case only the singular is used as you correctly stated earlier. When I say it loud in the wrong way in my head it only comes to mind the way english/deutch or people not familiar with the language would say it.

[–] Lipsy #bornnotworn 1 points Edited

That observation is strictly limited to how educated people write. It's deliberately not about how people say stuff out loud.

Despite having the writing style of a 12-year-old meth addict, I'm actually pretty weirdly obsessive about precise word choices. Unless I'm joking or being ironic, I mean every word I write, and I write every word I mean.

At the "educated" extreme of formality, spoken and written versions of "a language" are genuinely 2 distinct languages—i'm not discussing both.

(I'm still referring to the demographic as "native speakers", because that's what they are—there's no such thing as a native writer of anything.
This doesn't imply that I'm talking about spoken Spanish.)