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42 comments

[–] Totoro [OP] 39 points Edited

If this was a satirical ad created for a fictional story that criticized the makeup industry, everyone would think it's way too on the nose. But nope, it's just real.

Yeah, I thought it was some kind of joke or meme when I clicked on it. LOL

Some of us were born that way. I came out of my mom with make-up on my face. I just need to re-apply it, it's true.

HAHAHAH Remember that Simpsons episode where Krusty has to wear foundation to hide his natural clown face ? 😂😂

[–] DoomedSibyl 19 points Edited

Someone help me out here. Do people still wear foundation? Because even when I still wore makeup to work foundation wasn’t on the list. Most of the women I know either don’t wear makeup or only wear it for work or special occasions. I see heavy eye makeup on women in public all of the time, including those scary false eyelashes that look like they glued a caterpillar to their eyelid, but I really didn’t think that foundation was a thing anymore. Then again, I’m semi old and might be out of touch.

Random points, ironically, foundation is pretty bad for your skin and ages you faster or at least that’s my understanding. What is it with those false eyelashes? Is this really what turns men on? Because no kidding the more extreme ones really do look like a centipede. It’s not enhancing anything. It’s making the women wearing them look ridiculous.

I guess it illustrates just how oppressed, brainwashed and propagandized we can all get. This is after all a world where women are forced to degrade themselves in imitation of porn to find and keep the holy grail of a man. It makes me so sad for all of us. I read once that the cognitive dissonance that men hold between the hatred and contempt they feel for us and the compulsive desire for our bodies constitutes an actual mental illness.

Foundation is not nearly as noticeable as other makeup products. You may be seeing a lot more women wearing it than you realize. It was more noticeable back when a lot of brands had literally only 3 shades, but now that some have 50 or more, it matches better and looks more natural than it used to.

Maybe it's because I'm looking for it, but I always notice foundation because the texture on the skin never looks good no matter how smooth it is, and the too-even colouring of the face is distracting.

Ah, okay. Thank you. That makes sense. It’s just been over thirty-five years since I bought any. Back when there only were the three shades you mention. Lol. It always made me look orange so I stopped wearing it even when daily makeup was still a thing for me.

No, no, no. Makeup is eMpOwERiNg to women, and we should be grateful to men for discovering the tRaNsFoRmATiVe effect makeup has on us.

both of them to quickly discover the transformative power makeup had on women. Their vision was to create a makeup line that would celebrate individuality and inject joy back into an industry that had become rigidly led by rules, not fun. With a credit card, a laser-like focus, and a dream to celebrate and empower women, Too Faced was born in 1998.

Random points, ironically, foundation is pretty bad for your skin and ages you faster or at least that’s my understanding. What is it with those false eyelashes? Is this really what turns men on? Because no kidding the more extreme ones really do look like a centipede. It’s not enhancing anything. It’s making the women wearing them look ridiculous.

Former makeup industry worker here and just general makeup and skincare enthusiast. Eh, I wouldn't inherently say foundation is bad for your skin and ages you faster. I think people say that because in the 2000's in particular (can't speak to other generations because I wasn't alive/sentient) it was really popular to wear thick, full coverage, matte foundation. Historically there were far less finishes (matte vs dewey), coverages (light vs full), and also actual shades to choose from. I think as long as you are choosing the right foundation for your skin and taking care to remove it at the end of the day (and just do a basic skin care routine like wash makeup off, apply moisturizer) it's fine.

As for the giant false eyelashes, whether we like to admit this or not, I think there's a difference between what (straight) women like to wear and think makes them look attractive to men vs. what men think. I think men do like fuller, longer lashes, but the caterpillar-y ones I think are coming from women that just like that look. I've seen plenty of men making fun of this very thing which is why I am hesitant to believe that men are turned on by that. But of course, men do have indirect, direct, subtle, not so subtle, influences on beauty trends as well.

The really sad thing about the "caterpillar eyelashes" are that they were originally made for s*x workers to avoid "stuff" getting in their eyes. Now it's a trend, and whenever I see people wearing it in public I wonder if they know the true history behind it. :/

This sounds like an urban legend to me. Isn't it more likely that it originated as stage makeup? I can think of much better ways to prevent sperm getting in your eyes than wearing slightly longer eyelashes.

The really sad thing about the "caterpillar eyelashes" are that they were originally made for s*x workers to avoid "stuff" getting in their eyes. I've never heard of this, do you have a link or something? I came into makeup via theater and performance, and had always just presumed the large lashes came from stage makeup (since you usually need to do more exaggerated makeup in order for things to be visible to the audience).

As a teenager, you're on the nose on this one. Most people that I know who wear make-up at my high school are super insecure either about their skin (acne, not having a symmetrical face, etc) or like to "impress" dudes with it. I'm a lesbian so I don't really understand it, but either way I've made a point to not wear it just because I want to love myself just the way I am.

I always find those false lashes look like one of those small brooms for fireplaces. I have no idea why women wear them. They look ridiculous.

And agree about the foundation. An old friend is a beautician and she keeps advising her customers to avoid it like the plague. Apaprently it creates all sorts of skin problems, it blocks your pores, etc.

A friend's girlfriend wears it abusively and keeps leaving orange stains on every oight coloured fabric she approaches. Like... Why ???

I have rosacea and I used to wear foundation whenever I left the house. Thankfully I got over that!

Same! Cheers to us for revealing our clinical “rosiness” to all!

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It might be clever marketing to get their ad noticed by how silly it is. There are so many makeup brands out there. They all use the same chemists and put out the same colours. The only difference is how much they skimp on pigment and they come up with new names for “champagne rose” and pretend it’s a new never before seen colour.

[–] Totoro [OP] 1 points Edited

These are some very good points! I'm always skeptical when I see something so blatantly ridiculous/rage-inducing in marketing and my first thought it "they definitely did that on purpose for outrage clicks."

In this case, I wouldn't be surprised if that was at least partially their intent, but with how powerful abd prevalent libfem superficiality is I'm certain that's what they were appealing to. And as a side effect, that same thing would prevent the libfems from realizing the hypocrisy, and so the outrage angle would end up failing. It's kind of funny in a way haha.

I'm picturing some male ceo of a cosmetic company just laughing his way to the bank.

[–] ouvalemonde GIRLBO$$ 11 points

Yes

I mean, I do like that the CEO on the right is wearing at least two inches of his own high-grade industrial spackle. Marginally less annoying when men also feel compelled to plaster their faces. Marginally.

Also the dog clearly looks like he's not consenting to being part of this picture at all.

I remember a skin cream brand that had the tag line "[brand name]: your skin reflects your health". I alway thought well if that's the case, who needs your skin cream?

"Maybe she's born with it, maybe it's Mayb--the weight of the patriarchy crushing her soul!"

[–] ouvalemonde GIRLBO$$ 14 points Edited

I used to wear this foundation in my libfem days 🥴 notice that it says it's medium to full coverage -- ie it's a heavier and more "perfecting" foundation, rather than one that's meant to seem more natural (like a light foundation or a BB cream). So it's really ridiculous all around.

What makes this particularly icky is that it is clearly aimed at a message of "inclusiveness".

Back in the day, in the UK (I'm talking about the 1970s-1980s), leaving aside theatrical make-up, there was only one cosmetics firm that made shades for darker skins (for south Asian women or Black women, etc.). Then, about 20 years ago, cosmetic firms cottoned on to the fact that there was a whole new market out there just waiting to be colonized, and as a result darker shades of foundation and concealer and different colours of blusher and lipstick began to appear—and non-white models, of course, in the ads (as here: https://www.toofaced.com/collections/born-this-way).

So to my mind 'Born This Way' carries the message that the line is also catering to women who were 'Born Dark This Way'. It's progressive packaging for something sexist and retrograde. Yes, let's all be deluded together, sisters!

That’s a lot of glitter… was everyone here born with glitter on their face except me?? I better go buy some of this to fix that!

[–] PaulaAlquist 6 points Edited

There STILL isn't one that would match my skin.

(not that I'd wear it!)

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