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I would like to know how other radfems navigate the current academic world of social science with all the gender ideology that is prevalent in it (at least it is in my field). I study criminology, and gender ideology kinda seems like an untouchable topic. When I wrote a paper on reproductive justice within the criminal justice system, I was advised by my professor to not use the words "woman" or "female". Any time I bring up women's issues in class, it is met by "well, how does this apply to people who identify as something other than cis?" Male violence is an extremely relevant thing to discuss, and discuss accurately, but so far, I haven't heard of anybody studying gender ideology in criminology and the harms that it poses for women. Perhaps because they know they'll be blacklisted if they do. Instead, everyone is focusing on "queer criminology" and how trans people are so oppressed by the criminal justice system by not having their gender feeling affirmed. There's kind of this implicit rule that nobody is allowed to question or criticize it.

In addition, "sex work" is also a hot topic, where everyone (at least at my institution) is jumping on the bandwagon of it being empowering and a social good, but I seem to be the only person against it and knowledgeable about the subject. Despite my multiple attempts at educating people about it, everyone still refers to prostitution as "sex work", and while the women in my cohort have not challenged my expertise in the topic (I've interned at several organizations that dealt with trafficking and prostitution), I had one man try to prove me wrong by sending me a John Oliver segment. Cue the eye roll.

Is this happening in other social sciences or is this limited to criminology/sociology? Have any of you women been successful at challenging it without being outright kicked out of programs or fired?

I would like to know how other radfems navigate the current academic world of social science with all the gender ideology that is prevalent in it (at least it is in my field). I study criminology, and gender ideology kinda seems like an untouchable topic. When I wrote a paper on reproductive justice within the criminal justice system, I was advised by my professor to not use the words "woman" or "female". Any time I bring up women's issues in class, it is met by "well, how does this apply to people who identify as something other than cis?" Male violence is an extremely relevant thing to discuss, and discuss accurately, but so far, I haven't heard of anybody studying gender ideology in criminology and the harms that it poses for women. Perhaps because they know they'll be blacklisted if they do. Instead, everyone is focusing on "queer criminology" and how trans people are so oppressed by the criminal justice system by not having their gender feeling affirmed. There's kind of this implicit rule that nobody is allowed to question or criticize it. In addition, "sex work" is also a hot topic, where everyone (at least at my institution) is jumping on the bandwagon of it being empowering and a social good, but I seem to be the only person against it and knowledgeable about the subject. Despite my multiple attempts at educating people about it, everyone still refers to prostitution as "sex work", and while the women in my cohort have not challenged my expertise in the topic (I've interned at several organizations that dealt with trafficking and prostitution), I had one man try to prove me wrong by sending me a John Oliver segment. Cue the eye roll. Is this happening in other social sciences or is this limited to criminology/sociology? Have any of you women been successful at challenging it without being outright kicked out of programs or fired?

11 comments

I'm glad to hear that about law enforcement. Is your friend in a blue area or a red one?

Neither - we're Asian.

I do wonder if FOIA requests can show how committed to gender ideology the police really are, but perhaps that's too optimistic.