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I was watching (streaming) tv the other night and kept seeing the same commercial, repeatedly, for a PREP drug, Descovy. It was a typical US pharmaceutical commercial with narration while showing happy, smiling people - actors playing patients - doing happy, smiling things.

The narration stated that, "Descovy is not for people assigned female at birth," and I thought, "WTF? Why not?" but then the icing on the misogyny shit cake was when, after that disclaimer, the "patients" shown included a TIM. Once again, they are "women" except when being male benefits them.

Now, from this article OP posted:

women account for more than half of H.I.V cases in the world, they make up only 11 percent of participants in cure trials.

It's all got my head spinning. Women account for more than half of cases, yet treatment and prevention is aimed at men. Using cells produced BY WOMEN. Fuck everything about that.

Also, pretty much all girls and women who get HIV in the world contract it from males. Not from IV drug use or from sex with other females. And a lot of times, girls and women contract HIV through unwanted sex with males, either outright rape or sex forced on girls and women through coercion or marital duty.

Most of the girls and women getting HIV in the current century are poor ones in the less developed world, largely in sub Saharan Africa, where a widespread belief amongst males is that raping a virgin can cure a man of HIV.

Everywhere on earth, the people who spread HIV to members of both sexes are pretty much entirely male. Yet as you point out, both treatment and prevention are aimed at men.

The narration stated that, "Descovy is not for people assigned female at birth," and I thought, "WTF? Why not?"

Looks like it's not approved for women because it hasn't been proven to prevent transmission through vaginal sex - but of course, that's because the clinical trials didn't even include women.

I read about why HIV was more common in gay men at the beginning and it just has to do with the transmission of the virus being more likely during anal sex, basically, just due to the tissues and mechanics involved. That surprises me that women are not included because if PIV sex was already less likely to transmit HIV than anal, you would think it would be easy to test for when studying a drug like this?

Worldwide yes, but in the U.S. where that drug is created, the vast majority of HIV patients are male.

treatment and prevention is aimed at men.

And here is an example showing that isn't the case.