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I'm way behind the times, it came out last year, but just getting round to watching this now and seven hells, the parallels with trans medicine are stunning.

"Give them pain meds or they'll kill themselves!"

"The drugs aren't the problem, the users are" (heard that as similar to "detransitioners weren't true trans anyway")

The drug company looking for lifelong clients.

Drug reps "preaching the gospel of the opioid" (direct quote from episode 2)...

A drug crisis engineered by the pharmaceutical companies.

Online prescription services without any medical oversight or follow-up.

Specialist pain clinics.

Expanding the definition of pain. (Nonbinary, anyone?)

Off-label uses for drugs.

...

The opioid crisis obviously was on a much bigger scale and affected many more people, as well as not being necessarily accompanied with the phenomenon we see around gender, that I want to call a pseudo-religion, but there are still some stark parallels that are fascinating. But above all, the parallels are so stark that I can't help but wonder, the opioid crisis wasn't that long ago, the after-effects are still ongoing - how could this happen again, immediately?

I'm way behind the times, it came out last year, but just getting round to watching this now and seven hells, the parallels with trans medicine are stunning. "Give them pain meds or they'll kill themselves!" "The drugs aren't the problem, the users are" (heard that as similar to "detransitioners weren't true trans anyway") The drug company looking for lifelong clients. Drug reps "preaching the gospel of the opioid" (direct quote from episode 2)... A drug crisis engineered by the pharmaceutical companies. Online prescription services without any medical oversight or follow-up. Specialist pain clinics. Expanding the definition of pain. (Nonbinary, anyone?) Off-label uses for drugs. ... The opioid crisis obviously was on a much bigger scale and affected many more people, as well as not being necessarily accompanied with the phenomenon we see around gender, that I want to call a pseudo-religion, but there are still some stark parallels that are fascinating. But above all, the parallels are *so* stark that I can't help but wonder, the opioid crisis wasn't that long ago, the after-effects are still ongoing - how could this happen again, immediately?

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I can't help but wonder, the opioid crisis wasn't that long ago, the after-effects are still ongoing - how could this happen again, immediately?

The drug companies figured out that, if they could tie "trans medicine" into a sacred religious/political ideology, it would be much harder for them to be called out and held accountable for ruining lives. And, sadly, they're right. A lot of lives will have to be ruined or ended by this trans shit before anything is done because a lot of folks in politics and the media have a vested interest in hiding the bad outcomes of "trans health care"

[–] hypatia 3 points Edited

I really recommend the Hulu show Dopesick as well. It's really good and well done.

The answer to how could it happen:

There is an upper class of Americans who see the average person as nothing but a money generation unit. They either send them to a private prison, where they can make money off of keeping them caged, or ensnare them in a job at a large company where every ounce of productivity is wrung from them for as little wages as possible. If you are not in prison, your economic purpose in life is to go into debt and consume so that you can make your debt-holder wealthy.

These people are leeches and parasites and have destroyed our country.

Dopesick was so good. It really exposed the evil of the Sackler family, how they created new, fake concepts like "breakthrough pain" to justify doctors writing stronger and stronger prescriptions for Oxy, while claiming it was not addictive.

I don't see such an obvious villain with the perpetuation and medicalization of trans, I don't see the pharmaceutical companies having been the force that started this like the Sacklers/Perdue Pharmaceuticals did with Oxy. What I do see as similar is doctors and other medical professionals coming under the sway of powerful forces and ignoring everything they ever learned and everything they see, or those who do see the problem fearing to speaking out.

Doctors who practiced for decades knew you didn't give opiates for minor pain, like an ankle sprain. But they got swept up in the idea that there was a problem, untreated pain, that they had to address and Oxy was their answer.

The same way doctors and mental health professionals have practiced for decades and not seen the level of suicidality that would have had to exist if being trans was real but people could not come out. Yet they've either bought into something that objectively can't be true or they're too afraid to speak out and challenge the "gender affirmation only" model.

Opioids and trans medicine have a lot of commonalities but the biggest is that they make people money. That's why they're passively tolerated by the government.

Another link is that the surgeries trans people get often require opioid painkillers (because having one's genitals mutilated hurts!). So they can profit off trans people via hormones, surgery, AND a permanent dependence in painkillers!

Amen to that. But how can it be legal? That's not medicine, it's business.

Precisely. As long as they can disguise these money making schemes as "necessary medicine," they can keep pushing it. That being said, at least opioids have some legitimate (if limited) medicinal usage. Trans "medicine" is pure butchery, disfigurement, and profit.

(I haven't seen this documentary.)

Addictions and other dysfunctional behaviour like transitioning are a natural response to an unnatural environment. When people lack adequate social support networks, when they don't have enough stability in their lives, they self-medicate. If it isn't one thing, it's another (food, consumerism, the list goes on and on, plus also opposites like starvation and probably minimalism). People become obsessed with one fix or another, and of course others step in to profit, but as long as communities are fragmented or lost, it's going to keep happening. There will always be new drug crises as long as people need to self-medicate.

The real issue is how run-away capitalism destroys communities and leaves people to fend for themselves when they can't. Addictions predictably follow modernization rather than drug availability. Most people manage to cobble together some sort of life, fortunately.

(Why, yes, I am currently reading a book on this: Bruce Alexander, 2008. The globalisation of addiction: A study in poverty of the spirit. I think Alexander is the one who came up with Rat Park, which demonstrated that rats in enriched environments have no interest in drugs they consume madly in deprived environments.)

Oh I must read that, it sounds fascinating! Because yes, you are right, we are surrounded by dysfunctional behaviour.

I take opioid painkillers for severe chronic pain. I’ve tried everything, and they are the only thing that helps. It should be noted that only about 3% of people who take them for pain are addicted (abuse them). Physically dependent, yes. We take our pills exactly as prescribed. They don’t make me high. I feel nothing. Anymore, it is extremely difficult to get a prescription , because doctors are paranoid. Most of the people who get addicted started using them recreationally, not from a prescription. That came later, and doctors and pharmaceutical companies were guilty of gross negligence and making the crisis worse. I guess I sound defensive, but I had to say it. That said, I do see some similarities between the opioid crisis and TIPs, especially the role of drug companies and the money involved. Ditto for doctors back when they prescribing them for anyone with a stubbed toe.

I'm sure there are people, yourself included, for whom opiates are the right call. (Possibly in contrast to trans medicine!) They've always had their uses when everything else has been exhausted. The difficulty I see is in handing them out like candy to anyone and everyone.

I was going to say almost the same types of things you said, too. I have a genetic condition that causes me various levels of pain pretty much all day, every day. I had to try a million different things before I was ever put on opiate pain pills (also wanted to add, this was also way more things I had to try than the average man I've known has had to try before being giving pain meds, but that's another conversation for another time). I never take more than I'm supposed to, never gotten high, and I think I'm actually incapable of getting high off then if I want to, because I start to get nauseous and feel uncomfortable even when I take more than a certain amount I usually take (again, still as prescribed).

I do see a lot of parallels between the opioid crisis and the trans bullshit, but it feels even more insidious. They didn't use kids like the TRAs do (as far as I have seen). People get an addiction to the attention and the expectation of more hormones, surgeries, etc. Many of them describe it like a high. And then, as we've seen, after they can no longer get more surgeries or whatever, they are let down even more.