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38 comments

  1. It is not covered by insurance and is undergone by a population who tend to be low income and require it for any medical procedure

  2. Surgeons are supposed to completely remove any mammary tissue and glands (leaving less than a typical males who would still grow boobs under circumstances) so taking estrogen (and assorted) hormones after the procedure will not signal any estrogenic tissue to mature and you will remain flat chested or growth will be non-uniform in the future

  3. You could need tissue expanders bc they sew the skin pretty tight normally, the nipples are at more of a risk of falling off after being re-grafted on once before. Which is a relatively advanced surgical skill.

  4. Getting implants for cosmetic reasons is bad, they need to be replaced every 10-20 years which means if your patient gets a mastectomy at 12 years old and wants to maintain prosthetics for her life (ideally like 60 years) she will have to go under general anaesthetic five to ten times, maybe they will have to have her chest operated on a few more times than that because of complications etc. This is dangerous and again outrageously resource expensive for ppl that are low income.

If you get a mastectomy for cancer or for aesthetic reasons I'd advise you just to leave it. It doesn't look bad or anything or make you less of a woman. Also related that breast cancer surgeons are now more likely to do a flat mastectomy than automatically leaving the breast skin empty for future implants as it's less stressful for the patient

Very good points. I’d like to add breast implant illness, an autoimmune-ish illness many women get after implants. They haven’t studied how common it is, but the link mentions a facebook group with 100,000 members.

https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/breast-reconstruction/types/implant-reconstruction/illness/breast-implant-illness

Probably stems from having foreign bodies inside you long term. Bodies generally react very poorly to anything foreign, whether it’s implants or donor tissue.