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35 comments

people with uteri

There's a reason TRAs usually use the term "people with a uterus". This sounds like she's talking about a bunch of women who are like kitsune, but with nine uteri instead of nine tails.

This was going to be my point

I only have one uterus

My cousin, who is a woman, no longer has any uterus

But I dont know any woman with many uteri, and no men with any uteri

My sister actually has a double uterus but that's (obviously) very rare lol

Bette probably just meant your sister

Wow. Cool that she caught the attention of The Devine Miss M

[–] Carrots90 33 points Edited

Bette, darling…

You will only get headpats for this drivel if you are a man.

As a woman, you are merely doing as expected/demanded of you

If you want attention, albeit negative attention, you must step out of line and tout reality.

Yeah, that's what I really don't get about when women capitulate to this. We definitely aren't going to be rewarded for it and celebrated the way men are.

Exactly.

I get that speaking out gets bad blowback

But staying quiet is usually safe. They don’t want to push us that far. Pissing off a large group of women would be waking a sleeping giant

[–] mrsmeyers 28 points Edited

Invasion of the body snatchers level stuff.

Hope she's ready for it to never be enough. TRAs won't be happy until you die- that's the price of going against the ideology.

EDIT: Most of the replies to this tweet are people being disappointed with her brainwashing and pointing out how misogynistic it is. So she doesn't even get validated by TRAs. She's all on her own.

[–] ProxyMusic 24 points Edited

One third of women in the USA will not have a uterus by the time they reach age 65. The number of women in the USA without a uterus today is reportedly more than 20 million.

Is Bette suggesting that the votes of American women with a uterus do count more, or should count more, than the votes of American women without a uterus - and therefore the 20 million+ women without a uterus like me can sit out this election? Is Bette implying that women without a uterus won't be as affected by the results of the upcoming election as women with a uterus?

Seems a bit ageist and not very inclusive.

Do better, Bette. Educate yourself.

Wait wtf. I had no idea hysterectomies were that common.

Does anyone else feel like there's some kind of deep unconscious hatred of the female body at work in our society with 1/3 of women having there uterus removed?

Yeah, seems like it. That's an insane amount of women getting a body part removed (which causes a lot of severe side-effects). Seems like if women's health was prioritized from the get-go (as it should be, since women are more important to human survival than men are), maybe this wouldn't be necessary, maybe we'd have found a better way to deal with the diseases that supposedly now necessitate hysterectomies.

It's terrible, and I HOPE that statistic doesn't come true considering that we know how harmful those "routine hysterectomies" are and that ALL hysterectomies are incredibly dangerous and harmful to women's health.

I think they're most harmful prior to menopause. After menopause they're not as dangerous

[–] ProxyMusic -1 points Edited

ALL hysterectomies are incredibly dangerous and harmful to women's health.

I don't think it's fair to say this. Lots of women get hysterectomy voluntarily due to serious, life-limiting and even life-threatening health problems that we consider more harmful to us, our health, our overall wellbeing and our potential longevity than whatever downsides we might be at risk of or experience from having our uterus removed and living for years and decades without a uterus.

As to how dangerous hysterectomy is: all surgery is dangerous, particularly if it involves general anesthesia. But the dangers of hysterectomy vary considerably depending on the method used. Hysterectomy done vaginally is extremely safe, doesn't require fully anesthesia (a spinal block and "twilight sleep" will do), and has a very quick recovery time. I had a vaginal hysterectomy and was up and about and walking my kids to school in less than a week.

Truly? that seems so high to not have heard of before. Where'd you hear it?

[–] ProxyMusic 0 points Edited

An article published in 2016 - The End of the Hysterectomy Epidemic and Endometrial Cancer Incidence: What Are the Unintended Consequences of Declining Hysterectomy Rates? - says

An estimated 20 million US women have had a hysterectomy; more than one-third of all women have had a hysterectomy by age 60 (1–3)

Hysterectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures among women of reproductive age in the United States, second only to cesarean delivery. Approximately 600,000 hysterectomies are performed annually in the United States (1).

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fonc.2016.00089/full

However, the 600,000 figure is now out of date. Hysterectomy in the US reached is peak in 2002, a year when more than 681,000 women in the US had the procedure.

Starting in 2003, the rate of hysterectomy started to decline in the US:

The number of hysterectomies performed annually rose from 543,812 in 1998 to a peak of 681,234 in 2002; it then declined consistently annually and reached 433,621 cases in 2010. Overall, 247,973 (36.4%) fewer hysterectomies were performed in 2010 compared with 2002.

https://journals.lww.com/greenjournal/Abstract/2013/08000/Nationwide_Trends_in_the_Performance_of_Inpatient.8.aspx

A paper published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology this year (2022) reports that

Although overall hysterectomy prevalence changed little between 2006 and 2016 (21.4% and 21.1%, respectively), hysterectomy prevalence was lower in 2016 than in 2006 among women aged ≥40 years, particularly among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic women.

Hysterectomy is [still] the most common nonobstetrical medical procedure performed in US women.

https://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(22)00482-3/fulltext

"Hysterectomy ranks just behind Cesarean section as the second most common surgery among women in the United States."

https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-facts-about-hysterectomy-in-the-united-states-3520837

Even with US hysterectomy rates declining, the long life spans of women in the US - and the large number of women who are of and past the age when hysterectomy is most commonly performed - mean there are many millions more women who've had hysterectomy alive today than most people realize. A majority of women who have hysterectomy have the operation in their 40s, usually early-mid 40s, after they have completed childbearing or they have grown too old or nearly too old to have children and doctors thus can no longer deny hysterectomy to patients on the grounds of preserving future childbearing potential.

Most women who have hysterectomy live at least another 40 years after having the operation. Some live another 50 and 60 years years afterwards. In 2019, more than 30 million women in the US were age 65 and older; and another 40-50 million women were age 45-64. Meaning that 70-80 million women in the US were of/past the age when hysterectomy is most commonly done. There are a lot of women who had hysterectomies in the 80s, 90s, early 2000s like me still living. I personally know or know of several women now in their 90s who had hysterectomies in the 1970s.

If you haven't had hysterectomy, wanted one, sought one or needed one - or you haven't reach the point in your own life where you're hanging out mostly with women "of a certain age" and concerned with the health problems of senior women - hysterectomy probably seems like something that isn't all that common. But once you've had one like me, or you enter you dotage like me, you find that there are a whole lot of older women in the club.

Wow! Both for the information itself, and for the amount of work that you put into this response. Thank you for both. I really had no idea. I think this is another area where, because women don’t talk about their health like it matters, because people don’t study it like it matters, we are largely ignorant. So perhaps it’s just generational and, as you said, in later years you realize how many of your sisters have gone through the same. Wow. I wonder why the decline.

[–] Cailin 20 points Edited

How gross is it to describe people by internal organs/body parts 🤮

When you think about it, it’s absolutely insane and ridiculous language:

Can all people with intestines please come this way?

Calling all people with a liver, don’t forget to vote.

Herschel Walker got 0 men pregnant because 0 men can get pregnant.

Sad to see another high-profile feminist brought to heel by this misogynistic movement.

From a distance, and especially up close, men are not women are not men!

People with uteri = woman pregnant with a female fetus

Oh yeah, true. I guess those, and the very rare women born with a double uterus, are the only ones being called to vote, lol!

I thought it was temporarily OK to say "women" again until the day after the midterms?

Wait, did she fuck that up? Is she telling women (uteri ppl ugh) to get out and vote, twice? The way she worded this made it sound like she had a stroke when she typed it, lol. How embarrassing for this boomer handmaiden.

[–] hmimperialtortie 🐈🐈🐈🐈🐈 5 points

Bette, if this isn’t you, stop hiring useless wokerati to run your Twitter account.

If this is you, take on a bit more of your Barbara Stone attitude.

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