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People who say "Season's greetings" because supposedly "Merry Christmas" is offensive only to turn around and say "Happy Hanukkah" or "Eid Mubarak" grind my gears.

Same goes for people who snark on Evangelicals but god forbid if you make a comparison between Muslims and said Evangelicals.

How about we stay consistent about how we treat different faiths, huh?

I might be becoming more conservative but it really pisses me off this Christmas time.

People who say "Season's greetings" because supposedly "Merry Christmas" is offensive only to turn around and say "Happy Hanukkah" or "Eid Mubarak" grind my gears. Same goes for people who snark on Evangelicals but god forbid if you make a comparison between Muslims and said Evangelicals. How about we stay consistent about how we treat different faiths, huh? I might be becoming more conservative but it really pisses me off this Christmas time.

16 comments

Idk, I say Merry Christmas on Christmas and Happy Holidays the rest of December.

I see the opposite a lot too. "Merry Christmas" said to me in a spiteful way as if I'm being dared to challenge them even though we live somewhere that's like 90% Christian and literally no one is going to say anything.

"Merry Christmas" said to me in a spiteful way

I just have to laugh when I get this. So much for Christmas spirit!

I don't think I've ever heard anyone actually say "Season's Greetings" out loud. I see it written on signs frequently, but never spoken.

"Happy Holidays" feels completely neutral to me. I interpret "holidays" to mean "the days many of us have off work", unconnected to however people choose to spend them. It's the December equivalent of "Have a nice day."

I’m Jewish and never presume to know someone else’s faith unless they are wearing religious clothing or jewelry. So for the twenty something years I spent in retail, I responded to people’s Merry Xmas with either “you too,” or “enjoy your holiday.” Never met with a complaint.

I haven't seen that particular bit of hypocrisy. Personally, I say Happy Hanukkah to Jews, Eid Mubarak to Muslims, and Merry Christmas to people who I know to be celebrating Christmas. I try to avoid saying "Merry Christmas!" to complete strangers. And when I send out cards, I'm increasingly making them New Year's cards, because that's more of a mass multicultural celebration than Christmas.

This is partly because it's just not logical to tell someone they should have a merry Christmas when their Christmas is going to consist of, say, working a busy shift in their family's Chinese restaurant. But it is partly because wishing people the wrong holiday can be grating on religious minorities. I try to avoid it because I think that's considerate. I am culturally Christian and do enjoy Christmas rituals, but I don't love it when people get very Christian on me. Like, "You have a blessed day!" I take it in the spirit of positivity in which it's intended, but there's a kind of unthinking Christian-as-default attitude behind it that I think my country (the US) needs to lose.

I say Merry Christmas because that’s what I celebrate.

But if I said Happy Holidays and someone responded with Happy Hanukkah or Happy Eid Mubarak, I’d say “and a Happy Hanukkah/Eid Mubarak to you too.”

I've never heard Season's Greetings spoken aloud. Usually people say Happy Holidays if they want to be inclusive, but I live in a very Christian area, so it's mostly just Merry Christmas.

"Season" makes me think of "Jesus is the reason for the season," which also gets a lot of traction here.

I don't say anything first. I respond to whatever the other person says with "thanks, you too!"

I literally don't care.... Yeah, it's virtue signaling, but at the end of the day it means the same thing as wishing someone a Merry Christmas or Happy Hanukkah, or any other holiday wish. It's a nice thing to say, so I can't get bent out of shape over it.

I say Merry Christmas, for the record, though, as I agree it's a bit silly to go out of your way to virtue signal when it's the sentiment that matters. I celebrate Christmas, but if a Jewish person said Happy Hanukkah to me, I'd take it in the same spirit. I'm not even really that religious, I never go to church. But it's cultural as much as religious to have a holiday to celebrate in late December. The details are sort of irrelevant.

When I visited the uk I was shocked how casually everyone says "merry Christmas", because it's completely secularized. Here in the US I feel like everything is marketed as a "holiday tree" or "holiday gifts." We know what holiday the tree is for hello. I don't know anyone who puts up an Eid tree, or even a solstice tree - and we aren't calling the menorah the "holiday menorah"?