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People who say "Season's greetings" because supposedly "Merry Christmas" is offensive only to turn around and say "Happy Hanukkah" or "Eid Mubarak" grind my gears.

Same goes for people who snark on Evangelicals but god forbid if you make a comparison between Muslims and said Evangelicals.

How about we stay consistent about how we treat different faiths, huh?

I might be becoming more conservative but it really pisses me off this Christmas time.

People who say "Season's greetings" because supposedly "Merry Christmas" is offensive only to turn around and say "Happy Hanukkah" or "Eid Mubarak" grind my gears. Same goes for people who snark on Evangelicals but god forbid if you make a comparison between Muslims and said Evangelicals. How about we stay consistent about how we treat different faiths, huh? I might be becoming more conservative but it really pisses me off this Christmas time.

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I haven't seen that particular bit of hypocrisy. Personally, I say Happy Hanukkah to Jews, Eid Mubarak to Muslims, and Merry Christmas to people who I know to be celebrating Christmas. I try to avoid saying "Merry Christmas!" to complete strangers. And when I send out cards, I'm increasingly making them New Year's cards, because that's more of a mass multicultural celebration than Christmas.

This is partly because it's just not logical to tell someone they should have a merry Christmas when their Christmas is going to consist of, say, working a busy shift in their family's Chinese restaurant. But it is partly because wishing people the wrong holiday can be grating on religious minorities. I try to avoid it because I think that's considerate. I am culturally Christian and do enjoy Christmas rituals, but I don't love it when people get very Christian on me. Like, "You have a blessed day!" I take it in the spirit of positivity in which it's intended, but there's a kind of unthinking Christian-as-default attitude behind it that I think my country (the US) needs to lose.