41

What the title says.

Slides are all copyrighted so I can't share them directly.

So I'm posting in the middle of a few days of doing continuing medical education videos (taking a lunch break) because this one made me mad. It was bad enough yesterday when a prenatal screening talk kept saying "pregnant person" omfg if you can't say woman at least say patient.

This is an accredited program, approved by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and is largely excellent. The presenters go into detail about risks of breast cancer, screening, treatment and even have a couple slides on male breast cancer screening in those men at risk. Also a good amount of info on survivorship care which I found especially informative.

Edit:. I meant to put this in here. The information from family history is vital. Apparently we are missing up to 65% of women who are at higher risk due to BRCA mutations because of incomplete family histories, small families without known history, or the gene coming from the father's side.

So gyns try to learn as much as you can about family history.

The other main takeaway I have is about survivorship care. Issues like pain and sexual problems and chemo brain and osteoporosis risk. I have so many breast cancer survivors in my various practices who are generally healthy and disappear to followup, and yet these are issues we need to talk about.

Overall I learned a lot that will help me help my patients and it was a good quality talk.

OH AND don't get a routine screening mammogram less than 6 weeks after a COVID-19 shot, as you can get a false positive on axillary (underarm) lymph nodes and wind up on the garden path to invasive tests and biopsies and such. Of course if you need a Mammo for other reasons don't hesitate, but if it's the routine screen it can wait a few weeks.

Then, sigh, yeah you know it, "challenges in transgender care.". I had some hope that the presenters would give us ideas on how to engage TiFs in routine exams and screening so they're not lost to follow-up. I thought they might talk about how TiFs might be missed on routine call-backs because the system flags them as male and we need to be aware and seek them out.

Nope. Those would be good ideas in helping our dysphoria (or whatever) female patients avoid advanced breast cancer, so why would we talk about those?

To sum up, we should tell "trans men" to be knowledgeable of their "chest health" and monitor for recurrence of "chest cancer."

"Chest cancer" - meaning what? Lung cancer? Skin cancer of the chest skin? Bone cancer in the ribcage?

No, meaning BREAST CANCER.

This is AFTER the slide specifically addressing MALE BREAST CANCER. Yes, men get breast cancer, in their breast tissue. Lifetime risk is smth like 1 in 850 and that's not including guys with a genetic risk.

So riddle me this. If (1) MEN get breast cancer, and (2) TMAM, then why not just call it what it is, BREAST CANCER. Just yknow, the man type in man breasts.

I worry that these women will avoid screening altogether. I already have heard form one of my gyne colleagues that it's hard to get them in for followups for cervical cancer because there's no "neutral" word for cervix.

I worry that there'll be much more advanced breast cancer showing up in younger patients because of this language issue.

Cancer is not an acceptable or reasonable consequence for having a weird delusion about your sex. I don't think messing with language is beneficial to TiFs in any way shape or form. If anything it will decrease their access to care.

I complained in the feedback form in a more professional sounding way. Not that it will do anything but come ON I paid money for this.

What the title says. Slides are all copyrighted so I can't share them directly. So I'm posting in the middle of a few days of doing continuing medical education videos (taking a lunch break) because this one made me mad. It was bad enough yesterday when a prenatal screening talk kept saying "pregnant person" omfg if you can't say woman at least say patient. This is an accredited program, approved by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and is largely excellent. The presenters go into detail about risks of breast cancer, screening, treatment and even have a couple slides on male breast cancer screening in those men at risk. Also a good amount of info on survivorship care which I found especially informative. Edit:. I meant to put this in here. The information from family history is vital. Apparently we are missing up to 65% of women who are at higher risk due to BRCA mutations because of incomplete family histories, small families without known history, or the gene coming from the father's side. So gyns try to learn as much as you can about family history. The other main takeaway I have is about survivorship care. Issues like pain and sexual problems and chemo brain and osteoporosis risk. I have so many breast cancer survivors in my various practices who are generally healthy and disappear to followup, and yet these are issues we need to talk about. Overall I learned a lot that will help me help my patients and it was a good quality talk. OH AND don't get a routine screening mammogram less than 6 weeks after a COVID-19 shot, as you can get a false positive on axillary (underarm) lymph nodes and wind up on the garden path to invasive tests and biopsies and such. Of course if you need a Mammo for other reasons don't hesitate, but if it's the routine screen it can wait a few weeks. Then, sigh, yeah you know it, "challenges in transgender care.". I had some hope that the presenters would give us ideas on how to engage TiFs in routine exams and screening so they're not lost to follow-up. I thought they might talk about how TiFs might be missed on routine call-backs because the system flags them as male and we need to be aware and seek them out. Nope. Those would be good ideas in helping our dysphoria (or whatever) female patients avoid advanced breast cancer, so why would we talk about those? To sum up, we should tell "trans men" to be knowledgeable of their "chest health" and monitor for recurrence of "chest cancer." "Chest cancer" - meaning what? Lung cancer? Skin cancer of the chest skin? Bone cancer in the ribcage? No, meaning BREAST CANCER. This is AFTER the slide specifically addressing MALE BREAST CANCER. Yes, men get breast cancer, in their breast tissue. Lifetime risk is smth like 1 in 850 and that's not including guys with a genetic risk. So riddle me this. If (1) MEN get breast cancer, and (2) TMAM, then why not just call it what it is, BREAST CANCER. Just yknow, the man type in man breasts. I worry that these women will avoid screening altogether. I already have heard form one of my gyne colleagues that it's hard to get them in for followups for cervical cancer because there's no "neutral" word for cervix. I worry that there'll be much more advanced breast cancer showing up in younger patients because of this language issue. Cancer is not an acceptable or reasonable consequence for having a weird delusion about your sex. I don't think messing with language is beneficial to TiFs in any way shape or form. If anything it will decrease their access to care. I complained in the feedback form in a more professional sounding way. Not that it will do anything but come ON I paid money for this.

22 comments

“Chest” cancer is such a juvenile and frankly obscurantic word which is truly chilling to see in a medical setting. It’s like saying “head” cancer for for skin cancer on the face.

Yup. Head cancer is a great example. Could be tongue, jaw, sinus, brain, eyeball, skin like you said, salivary gland...

Precision matters.

It's infuriating that they're happy to say that men get periods too and that women have penises too etc. But, when it comes to the breast tissue that both sexes actually do have they still need to fuck around with the language.

Right?!? Breasts are not a sexed body part. It makes no sense.

It makes sense if you see the TIFs as rejecting their womanhood due to trauma in many cases. They don't think they'll look super hot with man chest, AGP style, they want rid of part of their objectification. Acknowledging they have breasts reminds them they're still female and triggers an unpleasant reaction inside them.

But they don't need therapy or anything, they just need to be affirmed as male and never mention anything yucky and female.

Yeah, I think you're right that the term breast carries too heavy a connotation of sexualized objectification for them to tolerate. The accuracy is irrelevant

Why are people so fuckin weird about BREASTS.

[–] dixiechick547 18 points Edited

I dunno, but I told my husband to pick up some chicken chests and he responded WTF? As any sane person would. (This actually happened. Of course I didn’t mean to say chests, I had just read an article about not using the word breast to refer to breast cancer).

It reminds me of the way Victorians couldn’t say legs, they said ‘limbs’ and covered table legs in case the sight would make one think prurient thoughts. To be so full of porn and pedophilia Wokesville is bizarrely puritanical.

That's all sorts of fucked up.

Has it not occurred to the medical health professionals that the reason TIFs are not showing up to routine screenings is that their gender dysphoria is comorbid with other mental health issues, and being mentally ill with mood or personality disorders actively works against an individual making good choices for their long term wellbeing.

It's trans-washing to change some buzzwords and not even try to address the roots of the issue.

Yup it's why I worry so for these women who won't get screened or even think about it because of their mental illness.

Men have breasts and can get breast cancer. The normalization should be for describing men's chests with the word "breasts" - not the opposite.

In my job we do. Breast lump is breast lump and in a man is breast cancer until proven otherwise as they so rarely get the fibrocystic stuff we get. Breast is a different body part altogether from chest, whether make or female.

I complained in the feedback form in a more professional sounding way. Not that it will do anything but come ON I paid money for this.

Thank you for doing this. It's vital to complain and make your voice heard. I would have done the same.

Thank you. I also complained on the pregnant people one from yesterday.

Funny, I also did a prostate cancer one and the patients they referred to were all called male or males or man or men. 🤔

That is so ridiculous. Your logic is impeccable — delusions and obfuscating language to accommodate those delusions puts people at medical risk. And in this case it’s so ridiculous because men, biological men, get breast cancer. SMH CFPC!!

Thank you! Men have breast tissue and get breast cancer, so now we have what? TMAM but can't get breast cancer, so they're not like other men?!?. CFPC I want to stop paying fees.