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The excuse for leaving men's language untouched is always "we want this information to remain accessible to as many people as possible, though"

But the women's anatomy is the one that has been and still is under-studied, poorly understood, made highly taboo and considered shameful, so obfuscating the language of women's anatomy makes it harder for women who are ashamed of certain aspects of their female bodies, through no fault of their own, unable to access important, even life-saving information.

Meanwhile men's anatomy is not only not under-studied, considered taboo or shameful, but they shove it down everyone's throats 24/7 with constant references to their dicks and balls, which they are obsessed with to the point you would think every male is a homosexual. You cannot walk through a city for more than a few minute without seeing male genitals grafitti'd somewhere, good luck finding uteruses or vulvas tagged anywhere.

The real reason, besides the sheer hatred and disregard for women, is that the NHS is catering to middle and upper-class woke women and white TIMs (who cares about ESL immigrant women, right?), and then know men as a class don't care about woke shit nearly as much except to use it to beat women over the head with, and older men especially will have no clue what these new terms are (though "testical-haver" seems pretty self-explanatory to me) so they think, "better keep referring to men as men, oh but it's okay to expect women to learn the new dehumanizing woke terminology for their sex that changes every 5 minutes. I'm sure they don't mind being talked about like a non-specific sack of disconnected organs!"

The excuse for leaving men's language untouched is always "we want this information to remain accessible to as many people as possible, though"

Do people follow up with the point that there’s a double standard being enacted, though? If you want information about male-specific cancers to be accessible and leave associated pages alone for that, why not apply that same reasoning to female-specific ones?

So will October henceforth be dubbed "soft tissue cancer awareness month?"

"Save the soft tissue!" Sounds like a campaign for Kleenex.