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Does anyone have a list of all the contributions that women did for Humanity that males either minimized ( treated as less important basically ) and or took the credit for? Or even outright forgot?

I heard the husband of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley the woman who wrote the Frankenstein novel took the credit for her work for a long time and people only really started crediting her properly after she died or something...

I was wondering how common this is... For a husband, father, brother, son or other male family members or male figures in general to take most or all the credit for something a woman did...

Another thing that is also often forgotten is women's contributions to early computing... Lots of people have no idea that the very first programmer Augusta Ada Byron King, Countess of Lovelace was a woman for example and that she was a co-creator of the very first computer : https://www.britannica.com/story/ada-lovelace-the-first-computer-programmer

And now we have misogynists spreading lies about women not being good programmers and other junk as a result of this societal " amnesia " so to say so...

Failure to properly credit women can result in very bad consequences for women like people spreading lies that women did not do anything for Humanity other than be a " baby factory ", " bitch " , " complain " " whine " and " nag " for most of human history...

Does anyone have a list of all the contributions that women did for Humanity that males either minimized ( treated as less important basically ) and or took the credit for? Or even outright forgot? I heard the husband of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley the woman who wrote the Frankenstein novel took the credit for her work for a long time and people only really started crediting her properly after she died or something... I was wondering how common this is... For a husband, father, brother, son or other male family members or male figures in general to take most or all the credit for something a woman did... Another thing that is also often forgotten is women's contributions to early computing... Lots of people have no idea that the very first programmer Augusta Ada Byron King, Countess of Lovelace was a woman for example and that she was a co-creator of the very first computer : https://www.britannica.com/story/ada-lovelace-the-first-computer-programmer And now we have misogynists spreading lies about women not being good programmers and other junk as a result of this societal " amnesia " so to say so... Failure to properly credit women can result in very bad consequences for women like people spreading lies that women did not do anything for Humanity other than be a " baby factory ", " bitch " , " complain " " whine " and " nag " for most of human history...

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Fire? Cooking? Agriculture? Domestication of animals? Spirituality and mysticism? Society itself?

ALL HUMAN LIFE...?

[–] Femina [OP] 22 points Edited

Yeah I heard agriculture was likely created by women ( there are primitive cultures up to this day that consider agriculture to be " women's job " like some native tribes from South America ) but some of these things you mentioned are open to speculation I suppose...

There are very high chances that the very first calendars were created by cavewomen though... Namely that cavewomen started counting the days from their menstruation to the next one and this created the concept of a " month " as we know it today... The word " menses " is literally etymologically related to the word " month " and " moon " ...

It is a theory that makes a lot of sense since women have very good reasons to pay attention to their menstrual cycle to know when will be the next time they will likely start bleeding again and thus may have difficulties due to it...

[–] Alias_Rosie 30 points Edited

Dr. Sara Jo Baker, the first woman to earn a DrPH from NYU revolutionized maternal and child healthcare in Hell's Kitchen at the turn of the century. She was given the assignment by the board of health because all the male officials thought it was too hard and she would fail and prove that women can't do public health. By the time she retired, it's estimated that her programs prevented the deaths of 90,000 infants in New York tenements.

Personal hero of mine!

Mileva Marić, Einstein's first wife closely collaborated on their theories, including theory of relativity, but never received official recognition. Here is an article providing proof, explanation of her motivation to stay in shadows and Einstein's incestuous payback, some quick quotes:

By the end of their classes in 1900, Mileva and Albert had similar grades (4.7 and 4.6, respectively) except in applied physics where she got the top mark of 5 but he, only 1. She excelled at experimental work while he did not. But at the oral exam, Professor Minkowski gave 11 out of 12 to the four male students but only 5 to Mileva. Only Albert got his degree.

On 13 December 1900, they submitted a first article on capillarity signed only under Albert’s name. Nevertheless, both referred to this article in letters as their common article.

Dord Krstić [..] suggests that given the prevalent bias against women at the time, a publication co-signed with a woman might have carried less weight.

But nobody made it clearer than Albert Einstein himself that they collaborated on special relativity when he wrote to Mileva on 27 March 1901: “How happy and proud I will be when the two of us together will have brought our work on relative motion to a victorious conclusion.”

Krstić(2) wrote: “[Miloš] described how during the evenings and at night, when silence fell upon the town, the young married couple would sit together at the table and at the light of a kerosene lantern, they would work together on physics problems. Miloš Jr. spoke of how they calculated, wrote, read and debated.”

Gajin and Zarko Marić also reported hearing from Mileva’s father that during the Einstein’s visit to Novi Sad in 1905, Mileva confided to him: “Before our departure, we finished an important scientific work which will make my husband known around the world.”

Eight pages of Albert’s first lecture notes are in her handwriting. So is a letter drafted in 1910 in reply to Max Planck who had sought Albert’s opinion.

There's much more in the article linked above, and yes, it gets much more depressing.

Men constantly minimize or erase women's contributions one way or another, so there's too many to mention. Mary Anning did not get the credit she deserved. Zelda Fitzgerald got plagiarized by her own husband. Lise Meitner did not get to share a Nobel Prize with her collaborator. Credit for pioneering abstract art often goes to Kandinsky even though Hilma af Klint has abstract work that predates his (Kandinsky backdated his own art in an effort to be considered the first abstract artist and even then Hilma af Klint has him beat by several years).

Also, plenty of "genius" men only got their place in the hall of fame on the backs of women. For example, Vincent van Gogh has a woman to thank for his massive fame (Jo van Gogh-Bonger) and nobody cared until recently.

Every generation genius and famous women are in the mouth of everyone. They are widly admired and revered. The generationd dies off and withouth the lived experience the successes of women get forgeted while men stay in place. When I heard my parents talk about famous women from their time I usually know none of them. When as a historian I read things for a very distant past, the men I can know for sure, but all the women mentioned (that they always are, and revered) has been forgotten. So is the nature of patriarchy, every generation we must forget the female canon to impose the male one.

Great topic!

And don't forget Fanny Mendelssohn, who loved composing music so much that she consented to having her brother's name on it just to get it published.

Clara Schumann was arguably the greatest pianist of the 19th century, with an enduring legacy handed down through her students and their students. Only Liszt, arguably, was her equal. She was the mainstay of her husband, the composer Robert Schumann. Kept the household, raised the children, organized the tours, held everything together when his mental illness destroyed him, and composed some fine songs herself. Without her, we would not have so much of his music, which is very dear to me.

There are so many more of us that we'll never hear of. "Anonymous was a woman."

As with Tolstoy's wife and mother of their 13 children, Sofia. Without her work as editor and copywriter for his novels, there would be no novels. And he treated her like garbage.

https://thetempest.co/2021/01/03/history/sofia-tolstoy/

Oh yeah. There is a wonderful novel The Last Station (also a movie, but not as good), about Leo Tolstoy's final year of life and Sofia Tolstoy's reaction to her abuse.

Yes - saw a review and I'm going to read the book and see the film! I also have her translated diaries on my Kindle.

Nettie Stevens, geneticist who discovered sex chromosomes. Credit, fame etc. stolen by Wilson and Morgan.

[–] Tokenmom 15 points Edited

That would be a very long and incomplete list. If you haven't read it already, you might be interested in "Who cooked the Last Supper" by Rosalind miles.

I'll add Anna Marie Mozart to the list. Link Title

That is a great, funny book. Don't read the first American edition, expurgated of much of its humor, I'm told.

[–] DonnaFemina 9 points Edited

As a lifelong Shakespeare fan who never believed any of the "Shakespeare's plays were written by Philip Marlowe/Francis Bacon/etc.," my mind was radically changed when I read this article, and now I'm about as convinced as you can be that Emilia Bassano was bare minimum Shakespeare's co-writer, and quite possibly the sole author.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/06/who-is-shakespeare-emilia-bassano/588076/

Well this is an exciting theory, one I am thrilled to know. Thank you very much sister.

You're welcome. I had never bought the "someone else wrote Shakespeare's plays" idea, because I couldn't see why Marlowe, Bacon or any other professional writer would let someone else get credit for his work.

But if the true author or co-author was a WOMAN... now THAT makes sense. She wouldn't have been able to write plays for production in London theaters under her own name. But Shakespeare was a theater director. He gave her access, a pipeline for her work to be produced.

A few of the things that made the Emilia Bassano theory so compelling for me were:

  • For centuries we've been mystified about how Shakespeare could have known so much about life in a royal court or an aristocratic family, or so much about northern Italy, when he had no experience living in an artistocratic household or royal court and never went to Italy. Emilia Bassano was fostered in an aristocratic household, her parents were immigrants from northern Italy, and most of her relatives worked as musicians for the British royal court. Her involvement in, or authorship of, his works solves ALL the problems that we've always had with Shakespeare's lack of the knowledge needed to write his plays.

  • AND GET THIS... in one of Shakespeare's plays, a mural on a wall in a town in northern Italy is described. That mural really existed -- in the town Emilia Bassano's parents were from!

  • How did Shakespeare know anything about the Danish royal court (in Hamlet)? Emilia Bassano's foster-uncle traveled with a huge retinue to the Danish royal court, may have brought Emilia with him, and even if she didn't make the trip with him, when he got back he regaled the household with stories of his trip. AND GET THIS: two of the people in his retinue on the Denmark trip were named Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern! Those are the names of two characters in Hamlet!!!

YES! Oh, but this is so exciting! I am so giddy.

I'd never considered that a woman wrote the plays, but if this were a film here would be a montage of moment in the plays that make more sense, or have more power if the author is Emilia, not William. What a delightful gift you've given me, this idea to fall into. Thank you, sister!

Computing was a low paid "women's job" that lots of Black women were hired to do back in the day. Then, when computers became mainstream and a lucrative industry, suddenly it was a Boy's Club.

Also, Margaret Keane's husband tried to steal credit for her paintings. She took him to court and proved she was the artist by painting a picture in front of the judge

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