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It's a little bit late for International Women's Day, but it slipped my mind that I'd planned to replace this post then. But I guess it's always International Women's Day at Ovarit!

We've all got a Peak Trans story, but this thread is more of a 'Peak Patriarchy' - a place to share your journey into feminism.

I'm particularly interested in answers to questions like:

  • What drew you towards feminism?
  • What have been your experiences the feminist movement?
  • How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends?
  • Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised?
  • What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc?
  • What are your priorities as a feminist?

(This is not a questionnaire or a test - these are just prompts to get you thinking.)

Looking forward to reading everyone's responses!

Earlier threads: [1], [2]

It's a little bit late for International Women's Day, but it slipped my mind that I'd planned to replace this post then. But I guess it's always International Women's Day at Ovarit! We've all got a [Peak Trans](https://www.ovarit.com/o/GenderCritical/13499/peak-trans-reprise-iii-tell-your-story-here) story, but this thread is more of a 'Peak Patriarchy' - a place to share your journey into feminism. I'm particularly interested in answers to questions like: - What drew you towards feminism? - What have been your experiences the feminist movement? - How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends? - Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised? - What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc? - What are your priorities as a feminist? (This is not a questionnaire or a test - these are just prompts to get you thinking.) Looking forward to reading everyone's responses! Earlier threads: [[1](https://www.ovarit.com/o/WomensLiberation/2493/how-did-you-become-a-feminist-tell-your-story)], [[2](https://www.ovarit.com/o/WomensLiberation/10146/how-did-you-become-a-feminist-tell-your-story-part-2)]

30 comments

[–] EnchantedApple16 16 points (+16|-0)

I first started identifying with the term “feminist” when I was 14. My brother and I moved in with our dad for the first time since we were 5 and 6, and it was insane how differently we were treated. There was a double standard for everything. He was never hassled about his grades but I was constantly grounded for getting anything below a B+, it was fine if his room was a disaster but my room had to be spotless constantly. I had to cook and clean every day (including doing his laundry for him) and his only chore was mowing the lawn in the summer time. I could go on.

That was pretty much the extent of my feminism for a long time. I thought double standards were basically the biggest problem women faced, and I didn’t like how those double standards affected me, but I never thought about how it affected women as a whole.

It was actually tumblr in about 2012 that made me see how misogyny is everywhere, and that rape culture existed. But that was liberal feminism, and it never really sat right with me. I didn’t really know how having casual sex was good for women, or how pop stars dancing in lingerie on stage was empowering. I kept those thoughts to myself, but I completely agreed that TWAW, and that makeup was an art form, and that I shaved/waxed/tweezed every hair on my body because I liked it. My line of thinking was that the reason those things were criticized was because they were things women enjoyed, so it was my feminist duty to be as feminine as possible. Because that was showing the patriarchy that being a woman is okay, right? I didn’t see how all men (yes all men) benefitted from women’s desperation to live up to their impossible beauty standards and how my own choices to conform to those standards was hurting women as a whole.

I peaked trans right before I “peaked patriarchy” (love this phrase, btw). I made a comment on a reddit post that was apparently transphobic, and got downvoted to hell and someone commented something like “/r/gc is leaking” so I went to /r/GC and it was incredible. I’d finally found feminists who knew that prostitution wasn’t empowering, that TWAM, and that pornography was detrimental to women. There were so many people who were able to put my feelings into words a lot better than I ever could. Before finding /r/GC I thought radical feminists were basically libfems on steroids. I didn’t know even there were different kinds of feminism.

This was all just a little over a year ago, and it has been great. It made me look at my choices and think critically about them. It made me confront uncomfortable prejudices that I’d held for a long time against women, made me question my own motives for a lot of the things I did, and changed the way I see my own role in society.

I’m so thankful for this community.