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It's a little bit late for International Women's Day, but it slipped my mind that I'd planned to replace this post then. But I guess it's always International Women's Day at Ovarit!

We've all got a Peak Trans story, but this thread is more of a 'Peak Patriarchy' - a place to share your journey into feminism.

I'm particularly interested in answers to questions like:

  • What drew you towards feminism?
  • What have been your experiences the feminist movement?
  • How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends?
  • Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised?
  • What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc?
  • What are your priorities as a feminist?

(This is not a questionnaire or a test - these are just prompts to get you thinking.)

Looking forward to reading everyone's responses!

Earlier threads: [1], [2]

It's a little bit late for International Women's Day, but it slipped my mind that I'd planned to replace this post then. But I guess it's always International Women's Day at Ovarit! We've all got a [Peak Trans](https://www.ovarit.com/o/GenderCritical/13499/peak-trans-reprise-iii-tell-your-story-here) story, but this thread is more of a 'Peak Patriarchy' - a place to share your journey into feminism. I'm particularly interested in answers to questions like: - What drew you towards feminism? - What have been your experiences the feminist movement? - How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends? - Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised? - What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc? - What are your priorities as a feminist? (This is not a questionnaire or a test - these are just prompts to get you thinking.) Looking forward to reading everyone's responses! Earlier threads: [[1](https://www.ovarit.com/o/WomensLiberation/2493/how-did-you-become-a-feminist-tell-your-story)], [[2](https://www.ovarit.com/o/WomensLiberation/10146/how-did-you-become-a-feminist-tell-your-story-part-2)]

42 comments

It's hard to say exactly when I "became" a feminist, but there have been a number of experiences that definitely shaped my views on it. Lot of women in my family have pushed hard against society's limitations on what women are allowed to do, going back generations. Some openly identified themselves as feminists, others just...rebelled, one way or another.

I grew up taking so many recently won rights for granted. I'd read some of the 2nd wave essays and such and it just sounded like they were mostly fighting battles we'd won by then (not in hindsight). But 3rd wave was just so stupid. It was like having women's battle for self-determination and agency in the world reduced down to a bunch of Cosmo articles. How did manspreading become such a highly profile issue in a world where sex trafficking is still rampant? Why was how empowered some 21-year-old felt wearing high heels a regular feature, and not a word on what we can do to reduce the unequal burden of child care on women? Why did all of the answers being provided have the feeling of a sales pitch and the branding of a trendy accessory, and why did they all seem to lead to my friends and I feeling more uncomfortable, demeaned, pressured, disempowered, devalued, miserable? Thought "feminism" had lost the plot, wrote some social media things criticizing the direction it was taking, didn't know where the real feminists had gone and kind of drifted away from it.

Had a few real world experiences in a short window of time that shaped my thoughts on it a lot (including a couple that some Ovarit threads today reminded me of). Learned that men who call themselves feminists and can spend hours pontificating on the importance and nuances of consent can't actually be trusted to back women even in the face of no-ambiguity-whatsoever horrific male violence against us. Had a man who thought it was funny trick a friend and I into coming face to face with a battered and prostituted woman who was absolutely terrified (I can still see her face when morons babble about "SWIW!"). Learned that being female means being vulnerable to men even in your own car, in broad daylight with people around, and how quickly that can escalate. Had neighbors who belonged to a misogynistic cult.

Found feminism again when I found enough strength to actively question the trans nonsense; it went hand in hand. And here you all were.