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It's a little bit late for International Women's Day, but it slipped my mind that I'd planned to replace this post then. But I guess it's always International Women's Day at Ovarit!

We've all got a Peak Trans story, but this thread is more of a 'Peak Patriarchy' - a place to share your journey into feminism.

I'm particularly interested in answers to questions like:

  • What drew you towards feminism?
  • What have been your experiences the feminist movement?
  • How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends?
  • Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised?
  • What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc?
  • What are your priorities as a feminist?

(This is not a questionnaire or a test - these are just prompts to get you thinking.)

Looking forward to reading everyone's responses!

Earlier threads: [1], [2]

It's a little bit late for International Women's Day, but it slipped my mind that I'd planned to replace this post then. But I guess it's always International Women's Day at Ovarit! We've all got a [Peak Trans](https://www.ovarit.com/o/GenderCritical/13499/peak-trans-reprise-iii-tell-your-story-here) story, but this thread is more of a 'Peak Patriarchy' - a place to share your journey into feminism. I'm particularly interested in answers to questions like: - What drew you towards feminism? - What have been your experiences the feminist movement? - How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends? - Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised? - What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc? - What are your priorities as a feminist? (This is not a questionnaire or a test - these are just prompts to get you thinking.) Looking forward to reading everyone's responses! Earlier threads: [[1](https://www.ovarit.com/o/WomensLiberation/2493/how-did-you-become-a-feminist-tell-your-story)], [[2](https://www.ovarit.com/o/WomensLiberation/10146/how-did-you-become-a-feminist-tell-your-story-part-2)]

42 comments

[–] KollontaiPankhurst SocFem 3 points Edited

What drew you towards feminism?

In short, a lifetime of experience as a woman.

Longer version: I didn't really notice sexism as a little kid, but as soon as I hit puberty, the reality hit me. Catcalls form truckers and construction workers. Boys in school sending sexually explicit messages asking for things (why oh why did I have everyone I knew on facebook?!). My first college bf had a porn collection and didn't understand my problem with it. All of this and more eventually coalesced into my realization: something was fundamentally wrong, and feminism seemed to give me the answer I was looking for ever since puberty hit.

What have been your experiences in the feminist movement?

I find a lot of women I talk to, when I start getting into socialist feminism, become very very excited. I think a lot of women are initially attracted to liberal feminism, but find it a bit void of answers. I usually end up giving out book recommendations, and my hope is they follow suit!

How did you first encounter feminist thought? Books or blogs, youtubers or conversatisions with feminst friends?

Initially, tumblr to be honest. I was a young college activist, and I just straight up went into the feminist tag. It initially seemed I had two options: Liberal feminism or radical feminism. As I branched out into wikipedia, and then books, podcasts, etc. I found way more approaches historically and contemporarily.

Has your feminism changed over your life? For instance, were you a liberal feminist who radicalised?

I was initially kind of on the fence between liberal and radical. I liked some of liberal feminism's goals of putting women in positions of power and changing laws for equality. They had the basic groundwork it seemed. But they were too pro sex industry - and the sex industry was the last straw that drove me to feminism in the first place - so radical feminism, which was blatantly against the sex industry and pro Nordic model, attracted me more. Then I became a radical feminist, and over time, I became a socialist feminist as I began to include a marxist lens. Now I include multiple perspectives, postcolonial feminism and ecofeminism included, but I generally consider myself a socialist feminist first and foremost.

What changes has becoming a feminist made to your life, your perspectives, your activism, your relationships, etc?

being a feminist has led me to question everything, and probably helped hurdle me towards socialism to be honest, as I began to question authority, hierarchy, everything that I was supposed to just accept. It's also made me prioritize women in my life, and never compromise on this matter.

What are your priorities as a feminist?

Liberation of global women from the global economic dependence on men

Abolishing fast fashion, which primarily employs women in the third world under shitty conditions to enrich primarily male shareholders

Abolishing capitalism and the profit motive which keeps workers in poverty and exploits the earth causing climate change

Ensuring that health care and pension is separate from jobs, and universal basic income or other safety nets exist, in particular to enable women to actually choose whether they want to work and put their child in day-care (which needs to be widely available), or spend time with their child (this is a particular concern for me in reference to indigenous and linguistic minority women, who may not share the dominant culture, as economic factors forcing her into poverty to preserve culture or go back to work and potentially have the child be assimilated as very much an issue to me).

Changing the societal attitudes to view prostitution, pornography, and stripping to be misogynistic economic exploitation, including implementing the Nordic model. Honestly, I appreciate Iceland's efforts in this regard, and wish more countries would implement it.