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liberal feminism celebrates women, who sexualize their bodies for the male gaze. Some feminists disagree with that (so do I). So I wonder, if a hijab can be a feminist statement sometimes? If the woman wears it as protection against gross looks from men and/or statement against the constant objectification and sexualitation of the woman? Most Religions are misogynist, I know, but if that‘s her personal reality and if that‘s how she chooses to protect herself, isn’t that like a radical feminist woman, recognizing patriarchy as a reality and covering herself, not because of religious reasons, but her feminist values. I mean, women in both cases cover themselves and the root cause is misogyny, so why do people see a difference with a hijab?

liberal feminism celebrates women, who sexualize their bodies for the male gaze. Some feminists disagree with that (so do I). So I wonder, if a hijab can be a feminist statement sometimes? If the woman wears it as protection against gross looks from men and/or statement against the constant objectification and sexualitation of the woman? Most Religions are misogynist, I know, but if that‘s her personal reality and if that‘s how she chooses to protect herself, isn’t that like a radical feminist woman, recognizing patriarchy as a reality and covering herself, not because of religious reasons, but her feminist values. I mean, women in both cases cover themselves and the root cause is misogyny, so why do people see a difference with a hijab?

59 comments

[–] Medea 1 points (+2|-1) Edited

You know what's too provocative? Wearing shorts in the blistering sun, causing sun damage by baring as much skin as you can. The appeal to emotion because it's so necessary to wear barely anything in summer is just illogical.

A scarf (one, it's not scripture to wear multiple scarves...) have been used in desert climates by both sexes, protecting hair from sun damage in 50 degree celsius weather. Loose fitting breathable fabric covering the skin to protect from intense UV rays.

[–] maypelsyrup 2 points (+2|-0)

Not having the choice to wear less fabric and feel a breeze specifically due to defining it as immodesty is the problem. Showing your forearms and calves because it's hot while wearing sunscreen isn't comparable.

(one, it's not scripture to wear multiple scarves...)

but typical for hijabis to wear underscarves to keep it on and fitted, which is what I was references

Loose fitting breathable fabric covering the skin to protect from intense UV rays.

I'm very aware, but that doesn't work well in places that are humid rather than places with dry heat. Most of the world, outside of deserts, is humid during the summer.

Rash guards (special long sleeve material) can be useful for people with UV sensitivity in humid areas, but it's important for the clothes to be tight so that they wick away moisture... and obviously that wouldn't be allowed.

So there's the choice of either:

  1. It isn't extreme to wear sunscreen and allow breezes on your arms, legs, and head in humid weather

  2. Not covering 90% of your body and your body shape, despite climate, is immodest

One makes way more sense than the other

[–] Medea 1 points (+2|-1) Edited

Loose fitting breathable (it's in the name) fabrics like linen allow moisture wicking, what do you think humans did before man-made rash guard material and sunscreen? I can't think of anything worse than wearing nylon/lycra tight-fitting synthetics in humid weather all day. Or having to slather myself in sunscreen inundated with harmful chemicals constantly to prevent UV damage.

We're not talking about not having a choice. The OP specifically stated "sometimes". There's nothing innately oppressive about covering your arms, legs, hair, outside of religious coercion. There's no difference between that and your example of purposely wearing baggy clothes to hide the figure. It's just your opinion and perception that one is more extreme than the other.

[–] maypelsyrup 2 points (+2|-0)

Loose fitting breathable (it's in the name) fabrics like linen allow moisture wicking

No, extremely baggy clothes don't wick moisture because moisture wicking pulls sweat from your body and to the surface of the fabric then evaporates it. Baggy clothes may allow a level of breathability if the fabric doesn't create a moist environment, but moisture wicking doesn't happen if the fabric isn't at least relatively tight to your body.

what do you think humans did before man-made rash guard material and sunscreen?

We evolved different levels of melanin production and adapted body structure because we weren't traveling and intermingling far... That's how humans evolved in Africa millions of years before the concept of clothes, let alone breathable fabric.

There's no difference between that and your example of purposely wearing baggy clothes to hide the figure.

There is very obviously a difference between someone that is one of the biggest celebrities, heavily candidly photographed, and underaged wearing baggy clothes that still show skin in order to not sell their underaged body VS. an average woman covering everything but their hands (sometimes) and face (sometimes) in order to appear modest, with that concept stemming from overtly sexist religious practices.