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liberal feminism celebrates women, who sexualize their bodies for the male gaze. Some feminists disagree with that (so do I). So I wonder, if a hijab can be a feminist statement sometimes? If the woman wears it as protection against gross looks from men and/or statement against the constant objectification and sexualitation of the woman? Most Religions are misogynist, I know, but if that‘s her personal reality and if that‘s how she chooses to protect herself, isn’t that like a radical feminist woman, recognizing patriarchy as a reality and covering herself, not because of religious reasons, but her feminist values. I mean, women in both cases cover themselves and the root cause is misogyny, so why do people see a difference with a hijab?

liberal feminism celebrates women, who sexualize their bodies for the male gaze. Some feminists disagree with that (so do I). So I wonder, if a hijab can be a feminist statement sometimes? If the woman wears it as protection against gross looks from men and/or statement against the constant objectification and sexualitation of the woman? Most Religions are misogynist, I know, but if that‘s her personal reality and if that‘s how she chooses to protect herself, isn’t that like a radical feminist woman, recognizing patriarchy as a reality and covering herself, not because of religious reasons, but her feminist values. I mean, women in both cases cover themselves and the root cause is misogyny, so why do people see a difference with a hijab?

59 comments

[–] maypelsyrup 9 points (+9|-0)

My understanding is that the scarf was adopted by a lot of women in the Muslim world as an intermediary method of being able to participate in society outside the home while still sporting a marker of faith that would remind men that these are "sisters" and not to be messed with.

I've heard similar things. I've also heard that thousands of years ago Mohammad commanded the use of hijabs in order to prevent rape in vulnerable women, where being veiled creates a conglomerate of women that balances the power from grouping with the power from anonymity that lead to more men being persecuted for rape. The same thought process doesn't really apply to the current age.

[–] BluecatSarah 2 points (+2|-0)

I believe the origin was that elite women - starting with Muhammad’s family - “spoke through a grille” to men outside their family.

This got developed into a portable “grille” that women wore.

In the Ottoman Empire something similar happened to the Caliph - who ended up retreating to the palace and communicating only through viziers - who predictably enough ended up running everything.