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liberal feminism celebrates women, who sexualize their bodies for the male gaze. Some feminists disagree with that (so do I). So I wonder, if a hijab can be a feminist statement sometimes? If the woman wears it as protection against gross looks from men and/or statement against the constant objectification and sexualitation of the woman? Most Religions are misogynist, I know, but if that‘s her personal reality and if that‘s how she chooses to protect herself, isn’t that like a radical feminist woman, recognizing patriarchy as a reality and covering herself, not because of religious reasons, but her feminist values. I mean, women in both cases cover themselves and the root cause is misogyny, so why do people see a difference with a hijab?

liberal feminism celebrates women, who sexualize their bodies for the male gaze. Some feminists disagree with that (so do I). So I wonder, if a hijab can be a feminist statement sometimes? If the woman wears it as protection against gross looks from men and/or statement against the constant objectification and sexualitation of the woman? Most Religions are misogynist, I know, but if that‘s her personal reality and if that‘s how she chooses to protect herself, isn’t that like a radical feminist woman, recognizing patriarchy as a reality and covering herself, not because of religious reasons, but her feminist values. I mean, women in both cases cover themselves and the root cause is misogyny, so why do people see a difference with a hijab?

59 comments

[–] maypelsyrup 23 points (+23|-0)

I think that covering your hair, limbs, and neck to avoid the male gaze is counterintuitive and plays into women's obligation to form their appearance around what is acceptable to men. The male gaze happens to anyone who is a female; hijabis still get raped and still get sexualized focus from men, especially in countries where it is customary.

I don't believe overtly covering yourself is productive to liberation, it just moves the goalpost of what men will sexualize, and I don't want necks to be sexualized. The root causes need to be addressed before hijabs could be considered empowering, even when you view it from a secular level and aren't considering the religious piety implications of hijabs.