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Just picked up this book in a bookshop on Friday--wondering if anyone else has read it and would like to discuss :)

  1. The anecdote at the beginning of the first essay is so straightforward it's almost unbelievable and almost every day! What experiences have you had that are similar? Especially would like to know what you say to these men, and how your response may differ in the workplace/social spaces/public.

  2. One of her later essays mentions how family trees often lack women. How do you keep women alive in your family history?

Just picked up this book in a bookshop on Friday--wondering if anyone else has read it and would like to discuss :) 1. The anecdote at the beginning of the first essay is so straightforward it's almost unbelievable and almost every day! What experiences have you had that are similar? Especially would like to know what you say to these men, and how your response may differ in the workplace/social spaces/public. 2. One of her later essays mentions how family trees often lack women. How do you keep women alive in your family history?

8 comments

I loved loved loved it! It so described my own experience that it was uncanny to me. I'd read it every so often--it was on TomDispatch, I think, originally--and when it got put into a book of her essays (probably the one you bought), I bought that, too.

But then I heard she is now a TRA supporter, and that broke my heart . . .

And yes, I put her quote about women disappearing from the family tree in one of my books! Loved that, too.

So glad you found this book epb!

It was a powerful quote about disappearing women. It really hit home for me, especially since I decided to (instead of getting my traditional class ring for grad school) resize and engrave my great great aunt's wedding ring as my class ring. I put the initials of her (Dody), Peggy (my great great great aunt), and Jeanne, another great great aunt on the inside. As I am the first woman in the history of my entire family tree to get my graduate degree, I feel sharply the contrast between my life and the lives of these women who endured lives of abusive husbands and these three who had no posterity to remember them. I will remember these three women and I thank them for the part they played to get me here.

The TRA aspect about Solnit is surprising to me after reading this book. I felt so compelled by her message! Even after so much school I feel like I have so. much. to read.

I liked this book. I used to like Solnit (and taught her work) until her memoir detailing her work in the BDSM world and she came out so strongly for TRAs.

Oh dear. The book of essays is so compelling! I wonder makes a woman this brilliant take such positions.