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Hi everyone! Does anyone have suggestions for low impact cardio I can do at the gym? I've had a knee injury since childhood which makes most treadmill exercises unpleasant, and traditional biking isn't great either.

Unfortunately my gym's pool is almost exclusively families with kids this time of year or I'd do that.

Hi everyone! Does anyone have suggestions for low impact cardio I can do at the gym? I've had a knee injury since childhood which makes most treadmill exercises unpleasant, and traditional biking isn't great either. Unfortunately my gym's pool is almost exclusively families with kids this time of year or I'd do that.

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Pedaling backwards on an elliptical machine will help to strengthen your lower quads, which in turn will help stabilize your knees.

I also have a knee issue so have to be careful but I also focus on strength training rather than cardio. I was asking about HIIT classes at my gym because I’m interested but from what I can gather it involves jumping and the loathsome burpees. I was told that in a class the instructor can give you low impact versions of exercise so it might be worth your while talking to staff or even investing in a trainer for just one session so he or she can show you a tailored workout.

Squats are one of the best exercises out there and if you do them quickly enough they become cardio. At first I was dubious about the compatibility of squats with a dodgy knee but along with other leg strengthening exercises from my physio, they are actually good for knees as they build up the muscles that support them. I went from not being able to squat at all to managing 200 (not all in one go).

Exercise bikes are a good option - you can get recliner bikes at gyms if the other sort are too much.

Ashtanga or other flow yoga is quite good for getting you breathless but not being too hard on the knees and there are endless modifications for poses (although Ashtanga purists disdain props and the like but I believe in doing what’s right for your body).

Good old walking is a hugely underrated exercise. It can be incorporated quite simply into a daily routine by getting off at an earlier bus or train stop, using your lunch break to go for a walk around the block, borrowing a neighbour’s dog. Walking on a treadmill in a gym is also an option of course.

[–] otterstrom 2 points Edited

The elliptical is a great option, just make sure that you adjust the foot pedals and heights so that it works for your body, it gives your knees more of a gliding action that is less stress. Then, my recommendation which may not be suitable for the gym depending on your comfortability, but can be done at home, lay on the ground on your tummy, and then try to get up from the ground then roll to your side a couple of times and then get up fast and then roll to the other side and get up continue the role and push up and roll and push up kind of like a Burpee but with a roll in the center, taking your time to get backTo the floor and not worrying so much about how you look or pushing yourself, see how it goes. Play around with speed of rolling, getting up from your back versus your tummy, and the height at which you get up.

I'll try that out. Haven't heard about the tummy rolling.

[–] otterstrom 1 points Edited

Do have fun! What I love about this exercise is that it takes you out of the rigidity of range of movement that machines offer. Best image I can suggest for this is imagine that you’re A very happy dog who’s just found the perfect puddle of mud and you just have to roll around in it and then get up and shake it off and repeat. You’ll notice your heart rate soon enough🤣

If you’re able to bend your knee without issue, rowing machines are great cardio and low impact. The end of this video shows the complete range of motion: https://youtu.be/H0r_ZPXJLtg

Thanks for the video! I think that might be a little too intense on my knee.