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I wonder how covid survival will affect future generations.

[–] eyeswideopen 1 points Edited

The increased incidence of type 2 diabetes developing in people who have covid is just one example that will have an impact on future generations (children who have mothers with diabetes have a greater risk of developing metabolic disorders themselves).

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-00912-y

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4686846/

From the article:

The Covid pandemic will not leave a similar legacy though. Evolution works through your ability to reproduce and pass on your genes. Covid largely kills the elderly who have already passed the point of having children. It was plague's ability to kill across the age spectrum and in such great numbers that meant it had such a lasting impact.

Pretty interesting read!

They keep repeating that myth that it was pretty much just old people dying. It wasn't. Here in the USA I recall a news story about a 5yo girl who died from encephalitis caused by the virus. Healthy athletic young men and women have died from this too.

Now, did young people die in sufficient numbers to shift the gene pool? Maybe not, but I'm really tired of their deaths being downplayed.

I understand your frustration with feeling that the young people dying have been ignored. I think it’s like you said though - the article is focused on disease affecting human evolution, and since covid “largely killed elderly” so it didn’t affect our genetics. If this was an article trying to argue that children don’t need to be vaccinated against covid, that would harmfully downplaying young peoples deaths. I don’t see that happening here.

But the disease mainly targets people with specific health conditions.

Uh no. People with other health conditions who contracted covid were more likely to have severe cases and die.