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For me, it's AMD's Lisa Su. She has the technical chops to lead one of the foremost chipmakers in the world, she had the business acumen and strategic execution to bring about a resurgent AMD after years of stagnation, and her ethics are (as far as I have been able to see) impeccable. This is all in the American corporate environment, which is toxic enough to make it all even more impressive, and in a very male-dominated field that markets itself primarily to a male-dominated audience. There must be a very, very short list somewhere of "things that Lisa Su isn't good at"; if you told me that she's also an Olympic gold medalist, I'd absolutely believe you first and verify afterwards. Oh, and she also has an insanely good academic track record (from MIT, naturally) and can handle the media with aplomb.

If I was going to point at a woman today and say "See that? Don't let anyone ever tell you that you can't do just as much as she did", I'd be pointing at Lisa Su. She's not (directly) in a scientist role right now, but she's my STEM role model. Who's yours?

For me, it's AMD's [Lisa Su](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Su). She has the technical chops to lead one of the foremost chipmakers in the world, she had the business acumen and strategic execution to bring about a resurgent AMD after years of stagnation, and her ethics are (as far as I have been able to see) impeccable. This is all in the American corporate environment, which is toxic enough to make it all even more impressive, and in a very male-dominated field that markets itself primarily to a male-dominated audience. There must be a very, very short list somewhere of "things that Lisa Su *isn't* good at"; if you told me that she's also an Olympic gold medalist, I'd absolutely believe you first and verify afterwards. Oh, and she also has an insanely good academic track record (from MIT, naturally) and can handle the media with aplomb. If I was going to point at a woman today and say "See that? Don't let *anyone* ever tell you that you can't do just as much as she did", I'd be pointing at Lisa Su. She's not (directly) in a scientist role right now, but she's my STEM role model. Who's yours?

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There's 1 female programmer who made a very cool thing, back when I was a kid. It blew my mind that she did the whole thing herself; "wow, a woman can do all that! I wanna do the same one day".

I wish I could name her, but I did grow up to work on very similar things, and am open in RL about following her lead.

She's still out there working in a different tech area today - I really should send her a letter of thanks.

Please send her that letter, I'm sure she'd love to hear from you and all that you've accomplished!

[–] sensusquaeram 6 points Edited

Kay Redfield Jamison, now 74, still writing and working. She's currently the Dalio Professor in Mood Disorders and Psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She's bipolar, and was one of the first patients to also become a researcher and clinician specializing in bipolar. If you're looking for a good read, her memoir, An Unquiet Mind, is awesome. Also: https://youtu.be/eAC6jC4giu0

[–] gold_bee 4 points Edited

The Gen Z women coming into the workforce are super inspiring to me. There's an expectation for access and equal treatment that previous generations did not embody, and a greater awareness of misogynistic cultures and systems. It's a fresh mindset that promises to revolutionize the status quo.