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“Men use musical instruments to impersonate the sounds of great beasts or other powerful beings, they put on costumes and pretend to be ghosts or spirits and terrorize their community, they perform their sacred rituals and keep their secret paraphernalia in the largest and most central buildings of their settlements”

“Women have secrets too—less overwrought and perhaps more effective at remaining hidden as a consequence. Anthropologist Maurice Godelier writes among the Baruya of New Guinea that, “In male power, violence combines with ruse, fraud, and secrecy, all of which are used consciously to preserve and widen the distance that separates and protects men from women, as well as ensuring their superiority.”

“there is a little spiritualistic seance religion run by women.” He recorded the angry outburst against the uselessness of women by a man who implied that women turned the teaching about female pollution against men, and that women manipulated male fears to escape the drudgery of women's lot of gardening and cooking to spend time off in seclusion on the pretext of being, as Kamano men conceptualized it, in bad odor.”

this is interesting "There is a kind of competitive dynamic to this, where the sexes may strategically battle over their use as a tool of male dominance or female subversion of it." As usual men want to control, and women just want to be left the fuck alone.

As a side note, I was really keen to travel to Papua New Guinea for my zoology studies, but a guy from there, with who I worked, warned me against it. PNG is still a very dangerous place for women to travel - unless you have good contacts and protection.

Stories like these is why I am happy that all early humans were egalitarian hunter gathers theory is slowly getting challenged.

For example did you known indigenous american had a kingship without no agriculture.

"Carlos, also known as Calos or King Calusa (died 1567), was king or paramount chief of the Calusa people of Southwest Florida from about 1556 until his death. As his father, the preceding king, was also known as Carlos, he is sometimes called Carlos II. Carlos ruled over one of the most powerful and prosperous chiefdoms in the region at the time, controlling the coastal areas of southwest Florida and wielding influence throughout the southern peninsula. Contemporary Europeans recognized him as the most powerful chief in Florida."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_(Calusa)

Loved this, thanks.

I think it is very cool how there is sort of ritual/secrets "battle" between women and men in certain societies.

One thing I like about this evolutionary anthropologist is that he actually pushes against this "women like older men" in the past by saying it was coercion setup by older men, and not the that women actually wanted that.