11

Have you read her works? Did you like them?

I have her novel "Akata Witch" which I haven't read, yet.

Locus has published an interview with her that I haven't read yet, either.

I did, however, read her short story "The Palm Tree Bandit" and I loved it! Absolutely recommended, a very feminist tale.

Have you read her works? Did you like them? I have her novel "Akata Witch" which I haven't read, yet. Locus has published [an interview](https://locusmag.com/2021/05/nnedi-okorafor-that-which-is-hers/) with her that I haven't read yet, either. I did, however, read her short story ["The Palm Tree Bandit"](http://strangehorizons.com/fiction/the-palm-tree-bandit/) and I loved it! Absolutely recommended, a very feminist tale.

4 comments

That short story is great, I support the Palm Tree Bandit 😆.

I read her book Who Fears Death a few years ago, and remember it mostly positively except for just a lot of r*pe... it was often very dark, I'm sure you could find content warnings, but I think very accurate about horrific male violence and misogynistic oppression in a post-apocalyptic society.. well any number of societies really, who are we kidding. Males are males. I do remember liking the main character and the story overall except for my annoyance with the very sexist male characters who were supposed to be the "good ones" and their frequent het relationship drama.. as a lesbian it's doubly annoying but straight women shouldn't have to put up with shit either.

I derive extra schadenfreude from goodreads users whining about the book discussing female biology and the feminist POV being "too on the nose" as well, lol. I did also buy Akata Witch for my younger sister who I don't believe has read it yet.

Yeah, that's the problem basically with any "realistic" descriptions, that in order for them to be realistic they have to be violent. If it's not violent, it turns into unrealistic utopia. I guess finding a middle ground where it's both realistic and nonviolent is very hard, if not impossible.

It's not the violence so much as how graphic the author chooses to get with it, that I don't think it's necessary to show how bad it is for the women. Definitely much better than reading a creepy male author dwelling on rape scenes and such, though. I'll be interested to hear your thoughts if you end up picking it up!

Now that I have read the full interview, I want to share some highlights with you all.

About accepting our bodies:

Otherness has always been a theme I’m interested in, partially because that’s what I live – I’m Nigerian-American, I have been paralyzed before, and I have this invisible dis­ability that nobody knows about unless I talk about it. I live with that every day. I have all sorts of ways that I’m othered, but I’ve always been one to embrace those things, as opposed to lamenting the difficulties. At least for me, in my philosophy, there’s no way to be happy in life unless you accept that which is given to you. There’s just no other way.

About freedom to write about anything:

There's something that Noor does on the political level where I'm like, 'I'm dabbling in something that could get me in trouble.' I knew that as I was writing it, but I wrote it anyway. I was like, 'I should be able to just write this,' but more than usual I had to silence that voice saying, 'Don't do that. You probably shouldn't do that. You should probably just stay away from that issue.' I did manage to silence that voice, but I had to work harder than normal to do so.

About americentrism:

Explaining really basic things is the part that that's most frustrating. One thing that keeps coming up is people asking, 'How does this relate to American culture?' That makes my head want to explode. That's where Nnedi's eye start twitching, because I'm just like, 'Why does it have to relate to American culture? Can we have that discussion? Do you want to have that conversation? Oh, you don't? So let's just not bring that up.' It's a lot of explaining and clarifying. It shouldn't be new - it shouldn't be something that needs to be explained - but that's where we are.

I am now very intrigued about "Noor". I wonder if the political topic is the one that I (or anyone here, I guess) have in mind. "Remote Control", "Noor", and the short stories "Heart of the Matter" and "Mother of Invention" are from the same world.

(Edited to expand the first citation)